8 - FOOD WEBS READINGS: FREEMAN, 2005 Chapter 53 Pages...

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FOOD WEBS READINGS: FREEMAN, 2005 Chapter 53 Pages 1229-1242
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What is a Biological Community (I)? An assemblage of many populations, each of different species, that have similar requirements or tolerances. All species that interact with each other in a local area (acres or 1,000’s of square meters or smaller).
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What is a Biological Community (II)? Has a few species that are common (represented by many individuals), many more that are rare (represented by a few individuals) and most with intermediate population sizes. Named on the basis of vegetative type, prevalent species, moisture gradient, or geographical location. Characterized by productivity, key species, and/or species diversity.
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Milkweed Community: A Model for Study of Species Interactions Summer and fall insect visitors at milkweeds come to forage. The interactions that occur between species include herbivory, predation, parasitoidism and scavenging. These interactions can be summarized in a simple food web.
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Biotic Interactions in a Milkweed Community ( Summer ) Common milkweeds 1 attract a number of species of insect 14 and arachnid 1 species. Milkweeds act as resources for bees 3 , wasps 2 , ants 2 , butterflies 2 and moths 3 . Number of species in a particular milkweed community. Scientific American 253(1): 112-119
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Biotic Interactions in a Milkweed Community ( Summer ) Pollinators/Nectar Feeders - Bumble Bees 2 - Moths 3 (night) 1 Scientific American 253(1): 112-119
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Biotic Interactions in a Milkweed Community ( Summer ) Major Herbivores -Monarch Butterflies 1 Larvae eat leaves and young pods. Adults collect necter and pollen. Scientific American 253(1): 112-119
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Biotic Interactions in a Milkweed Community ( Summer ) Predator - Crab Spider 1 Parasitoids - Trachinid Flies 2 - Ichneumon 1 Scientific American 253(1): 112-119 .
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Biotic Interactions in a Milkweed Community ( Fall ) Milkweed 1 community in fall has a different assemblage of species 8 . Nectar feeders are gone. Aphids 1 (& 1
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Biotic Interactions in a Milkweed Community ( Fall ) Crab spiders 1 continue to ambush prey.
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2009 for the course CHEM 112 taught by Professor Jursich during the Spring '08 term at Ill. Chicago.

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8 - FOOD WEBS READINGS: FREEMAN, 2005 Chapter 53 Pages...

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