Protein Structure and Enzyme Function

Protein Structure and Enzyme Function - The...

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All Proteins Have a Specific Three-Dimensional Structure (Native Conformation) that is Required for Optimal Protein Function
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Proteins are Comprised of Individual Amino Acids Linked Together by Peptide Bonds
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The Variable Groups of Amino Acids are Called Side Chains and Project Outward from the Backbone of the Polypeptide
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There are 20 Different Amino Acids Commonly Found in Proteins. Each of These Amino Acids Has a Different Side Chain (R Group). Amino Acids Can be Classified According to the Physical Properties of the Side Chain.
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Unformatted text preview: The Three-Dimensional Structure of a Protein Is Formed due to Noncovalent Bonds that form Between Different Amino Acids The Structure of a Protein is Also Formed by Interactions of the Amino Acid Side Chains with the Aqueous Environment Ligand-Protein Interaction (Substrate-Enzyme Interaction) Protein Structure is Critical for Binding Site Function Ligands Bind to Proteins Through Noncovalent Bonds Corresponding Shapes Allow for the Maximum Number of Noncovalent Bonds = Sustained Interaction...
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2009 for the course BIO 480W taught by Professor Gaillard during the Spring '09 term at Sam Houston State University.

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Protein Structure and Enzyme Function - The...

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