Chapter 3

Chapter 3 - Criminal Behavior Theories, Typologies, and...

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Spring 2009 Criminal Behavior Theories, Typologies, and Criminal Justice J.B. Helfgott Seattle University CHAPTER 3 Typologies of Crime and Criminals Typologies of Crime and Criminals
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Typologies of Crime and Criminals Spring 2009 “There are two types of people in this world, good and bad. The good sleep better, but the bad seem to enjoy the waking hours much more.” -- Woody Allen
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Spring 2009 What is a Typology? A systematic grouping of entities that have characteristics or traits in common to classes of a particular system. An abstract category or class consisting of characteristics organized around a common principle relevant to a particular analysis.
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Typologies in Everyday Life, Science, and Policy and Practice Typology construction is a fundamental component of human cognition and scientific investigation. Examples of typologies we all use in everyday life? Examples of scientific typologies? How are typologies used at the institutional level in schools, hospitals, and the criminal justice system? Spring 2009
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Criminological Theories and Criminal Typologies Spring 2009 A CRIMINAL TYPOLOGY CRIMINAL TYPOLOGY is criminological theory made manageable in a way that can be practically applied to organize, classify, and make sense of a range of behaviors that violate the law. Examples?
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Spring 2009 Examples of Comprehensive Criminal Typologies Clinard, Quinney, & Wildeman’s (1994) Criminal Behavior Systems Dabney’s (2004) Crime Types Miethe, McCorkle, & Listwan’s (2006) Crime Profiles
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Mental Disorders and Criminal Behavior Mental illness is just one factor that may play a role in some incidents and types of criminal behavior. Mental disorder and criminal behavior are distinct concepts that sometimes overlap. Some mental disorders have been empirically associated with criminal behavior (antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy). Spring 2009
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Defining “Mental Disorder” When people speak of “mental disorder” this term encompasses an enormous range of human behavioral symptoms and conditions ranging from everyday problems in living to severe psychopathological disturbances. No definition adequately specifies precise No definition adequately specifies precise boundaries for the concept of ‘mental boundaries for the concept of ‘mental disorder’ disorder’ (APA, 2000, p. xxx). Spring 2009
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Conflicting Goals of the Mental Health and Criminal Justice Systems Conflicting goals of the mental health and criminal justice systems make it difficult to understand and respond to mentally ill offenders and to understand the relationship between mental illness and crime.
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Chapter 3 - Criminal Behavior Theories, Typologies, and...

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