Module5.Ch5.Notes - Criminal Behavior Theories Typologies and Criminal Justice J.B Helfgott Seattle University CHAPTER 5 Violent Crime College of

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College of Criminal Justice Understanding Human Behavior Criminal Behavior Theories, Typologies, and Criminal Justice J.B. Helfgott Seattle University CHAPTER 5 Violent Crime Violent Crime
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Violent Crime “Well, they started complaining about being tied up, and I re – reloosened the bonds a couple of times, tried to make Mr. Otero as comfortable as I could. Apparently he had a cracked rib from a car accident, so I had him put a pillow down on his – for his – for his head, had him put a – I think a parka or a coat underneath him. They – You know, they talked to me about, you know, giving the car whatever money. I guess they didn’t have very much money, and the – from there I realized that, you know, I was already – I didn’t have a mask on or anything. They already could ID me, and made – made a decision to go ahead and – and put ‘em down, I guess or strangle them.” --- Dennis Rader, the “BTK Killer” confessing to the murders of the Otero family Understanding Human Behavior For information on Rader see: http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,166072,00.html
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Popular Image v Reality of Violent crime Violence is primed in the public mind in such a way that many people grossly overestimate the likelihood that they will be the victims of random stranger violence. Most people are disproportionately fearful of statistically rare Most people are disproportionately fearful of statistically rare violent crimes that make news headlines while they grossly violent crimes that make news headlines while they grossly underestimate the chances of violent victimization at the hands underestimate the chances of violent victimization at the hands of people they know of people they know . It is important to keep in mind: Of the 14, 860 total murder victims reported in the UCR data for 2005, only 2,070 (1.4%) were committed by strangers (UCR, 2005). The statistical likelihood of dying from one’s own bad habits is higher than the likelihood of dying at the hands of a serial killer. Most violent crime involves offenders and victims who know each other. Most violence is an emotional reaction, not diabolical, methodical, or predatory. A large percentage of violent crime is mundane and ordinary. Understanding Human Behavior
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Violent Crime Statistics Of the 14,860 murder victims in 2005, 2050 (1.4%) did not know the offenders. Arrests for serious violent crime (murder and nonnegligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault) account for 4.3% of all arrests in the United States in 2005. Of the serious violent crime arrests in 2005, 63% was for aggravated assault, 30% for robbery, 6.2% for rape, and 1.2% for murder. U.S. Department of Justice reports violent victimization rates (and
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2009 for the course CJ 436 taught by Professor Latz during the Spring '08 term at Sam Houston State University.

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Module5.Ch5.Notes - Criminal Behavior Theories Typologies and Criminal Justice J.B Helfgott Seattle University CHAPTER 5 Violent Crime College of

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