Ward_Lect30A_Annelida_ppt

Ward_Lect30A_Annelida_ppt - BIS2C Winter 2009 (Ward)...

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BIS2C Winter 2009 (Ward) Lecture 30. Annelida Today’s lecture (4 March) Mollusca concluded (cephalopods) introduction to Annelida major features biology within-group diversity Second Wednesday lecture Arthropoda (part 1)
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Nematocyst-stealing nudibranchs some sea slugs ingest cnidarian tissue and store undischarged nematocysts in elongate protrusions on their back – ready to fire the sea slug thus expropriates the defensive mechanism of another animal
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Solar-powered sea slugs certain sea slugs feed on algae they digest most algal tissue but sequester the chloroplasts in their in their body, where they continue to function kleptoplasty: the stealing of plastids for use as photosynthetic machines Sacoglossan, Placida cf. dendritica , showing the green network of ducts which contain the green chloroplasts from its algal food. From: www.seaslugforum.net
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Cephalopods – nautiluses, squids, octopuses, cuttlefish, etc. wholly marine; actively mobile predators largest and smartest invertebrates foot modified as tentacles and a siphon nautilus with shell, in others shell is internal (squid, cuttlefish) or lost (octopus) locomotion by jet propulsion: siphon expels water from mantle cavity
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Cephalopods – nautiluses, squids, octopuses, cuttlefish, etc. capable of learning and memory tasks can learn by observation of others (experiments with octopuses)
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The cephalopod eye – single lens eye convergent with that of vertebrates excellent visual acuity some common genes ( rhodopsin , PAX6 ) involved in eye development in the two groups concept of “deep homology” (see recent Nature article*) *Shubin, N. et al. 2009. Deep homology and the origins of evolutionary novelty. Nature 457 :818-823.
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Communication in cephalopods is largely visual movements (of tentacles, fins, etc.) and body color changes chromatophores (cells with pigment): changes in shape changes in color
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Major lineages of metazoans Protostomes
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Major lineages of metazoans
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Protostomes Annelida
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Which statement is true about Annelida and Mollusca? 1. Spiral cleavage is a synapomorphy of Annelida + Mollusca.
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This document was uploaded on 04/02/2009.

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Ward_Lect30A_Annelida_ppt - BIS2C Winter 2009 (Ward)...

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