Lecture_7.a - Lecture 7 -Psychology of Personality We end...

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Lecture 7 -Psychology of Personality We end this part of our journey with a trio of influential theorists and practitioners who are not scientific in the traditional sense. Their impact has been substantial but their theories lack scientific proof and their ideas are somewhat incomplete and fractured. In some cases their ideas are clearly not accurate yet, their contributions have created profound change in the field of Psychology. We'll start with Carl Rogers whose main contribution was in the area of therapy and leading a balanced life. I think it would make him proud to be remembered as the one psychologist who saw good in everyone. Remember that Freud and colleagues saw humans struggling to throw off the shackles of their history. Rogers had none of that. Carl Ransom Rogers (1902 - 1987) Carl Rogers was born January 8, 1902 in Oak Park, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago, the fourth of six children. His father was a successful civil engineer and his mother was a housewife and devout Christian. His education started in the second grade, because he could already read before kindergarten. When Carl was 12, his family moved to a farm about 30 miles west of Chicago, and it was here that he was to spend his adolescence. With a strict upbringing and many chores, Carl was to become rather isolated, independent, and self-disciplined. He went on to the University of Wisconsin as a agriculture major. Later, he switched to religion to study for the ministry. During this time, he was selected as one of ten students to go to Beijing for the “World Student Christian Federation Conference” for six months. He tells us that his new experiences so broadened his thinking that he began to doubt some of his basic religious views. After graduation, he married Helen Elliot (against his parents’ wishes), moved to New York City, and began attending the Union Theological Seminary, a famous liberal religious institution. While there, he took a student organized seminar called “Why am I entering the ministry?” I might as well tell you that, unless you want to change your career, never take a class with such a title! He tells us that most of the participants “thought their way right out of religious work.” Religion’s loss was, of course, psychology’s gain: Rogers switched to the clinical psychology program of Columbia University, and received his Ph.D. in 1931. He had already begun his clinical work at the Rochester Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. At this clinic, he learned about Otto Rank’s theory and therapy techniques, which started him on the road to developing his own approach. What I am is good enough if I would only be it openly. He was offered a full professorship at Ohio State in 1940. In 1942, he wrote his first book, Counseling
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Lecture_7.a - Lecture 7 -Psychology of Personality We end...

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