Data Visualization Principles, Introduction

Data Visualization Principles, Introduction - MIS 6380 Data...

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MIS 6380 Data Visualization Principles, Introduction
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2 Communicate
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3 Engage
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4 Interact
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Explore 5
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A Science and an Art 6 Determine Need/Goal Collect and Clean Data Transform Data to Information: Representation Perform Evaluation: Communication Take Action What Can We Do to Improve these Processes? Via Our Choice of Representation
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9 = 72 8 = 56 7 = 42 6 = 30 5 = 20 3 = ? 7 Complete the Pattern…
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8 Representations (Broadly Speaking) motion voice sound symbols leverage environment
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Choice of Representations Pair up to play the sequence game. You want to assemble a sequence of three of the same or consecutive letters and numbers, e.g., A1, A2, A3 B1, B2, B3 A3, B3, C3 A1, B2, C3 etc. Your partner is trying to achieve the same goal. Once a combination is used, it is “owned” by the player and cannot be reused . First, play it verbally. Second, you can use pen and paper to keep track of who called out which combination. 9
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Efficient/Effective Representation 10 Effective representations transform cognitive problems into perceptual problems difficult perceptual problems to easier perceptual problems Sterelny , K. 2006. “Cognitive Load and Human Decision, or, Three Ways of Rolling the Rock Uphill,” The Innate Mind: Culture and Cognition, Volume 2 , P. Carruthers, S. Laurence, S. Stich (eds.), Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 218-236.
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Cognition Cognition: External stimuli is received, processed and action “taken” 11
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Distributed Cognition To process more efficiently/effectively, we shape or “borrow” from the environment to facilitate cognition 12
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How Should We Represent? 13 The key question: Are some representations better than others? If so, are there consistent qualities (are our interactions with representations learned or innate)? Semiotics : Symbol representation is learned and arbitrary Sensory : There is an innate universal inclination to interpret some forms of representations (therefore some designs are better than others) (therefore any representation is as good as another with proper training)
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14 Is there anything innate about how the mind processes visual input?
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Recognize the Environment 15 ( link )
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Processing Information 16
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Movement 17
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Movement 18
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A Few Cognition Principles We think in “chunks” 19
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A Few Cognition Principles How Do We 'Chunk' This? 20 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 10.1 11.15 12.2 8.1 13.7 15.6 14.5 13.33 17.4 19.12
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  • Fall '16
  • lbs, information visualization

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