Ehrenreich - * Ehrenreich, Barbara .1999. Nickel-and-dimed:...

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Unformatted text preview: * Ehrenreich, Barbara .1999. Nickel-and-dimed: On (not) getting by in America Harper's Magazine . New York: Jan 1999. Vol. 298: p. 37-53. Abstract (Summary) Ehrenreich, a middle-class journalist, goes undercover to learn first-hand what it's like to live as a welfare mother during this time of welfare reform. Jump to indexing (document details) Full Text (13114 words) Copyright Harper's Magazine Foundation Jan 1999 At the beginning of June 1998 I leave behind everything that normally soothes the ego and sustains the body-home, career, companion, reputation, ATM card-for a plunge into the low- wage workforce. There, I become another, occupationally much diminished "Barbara Ehrenreich"-depicted on job-application forms as a divorced homemaker whose sole work experience consists of housekeeping in a few private homes. I am terrified, at the beginning, of being unmasked for what I am: a middle-class journalist setting out to explore the world that welfare mothers are entering, at the rate of approximately 50,000 a month, as welfare reform kicks in. Happily, though, my fears turn out to be entirely unwarranted: during a month of poverty and toil, my name goes unnoticed and for the most part unuttered. In this parallel universe where my father never got out of the mines and I never got through college, I am "baby," "honey," "blondie," and, most commonly, "girl." My first task is to find a place to live. I figure that if I can earn $7 an hour-which, from the want ads, seems doable-I can afford to spend $500 on rent, or maybe, with severe economies, $600. In the Key West area, where I live, this pretty much confines me to flophouses and trailer homeslike the one, a pleasing fifteen-minute drive from town, that has no air-conditioning, no screens, no fans, no television, and, by way of diversion, only the challenge of evading the landlord's Doberman pinscher. The big problem with this place, though, is the rent, which at $675 a month is well beyond my reach. All right, Key West is expensive. But so is New York City, or the Bay Area, or Jackson Hole, or Telluride, or Boston, or any other place where tourists and the wealthy compete for living space with the people who clean their toilets and fry their hash browns.l Still, it is a shock to realize that "trailer trash" has become, for me, a demographic category to aspire to. So I decide to make the common trade-off between affordability and convenience, and go for a $500-a-month efficiency thirty miles up a twolane highway from the employment opportunities of Key West, meaning forty-five minutes if there's no road construction and I don't get caught behind some sun-dazed Canadian tourists. I hate the drive, along a roadside studded with white crosses commemorating the more effective head-on collisions, but it's a sweet little place-a cabin, more or less, set in the swampy back yard of the converted mobile home where my landlord, an affable TV repairman, lives with his bartender girlfriend. Anthropologically landlord, an affable TV repairman, lives with his bartender girlfriend....
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Ehrenreich - * Ehrenreich, Barbara .1999. Nickel-and-dimed:...

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