Lecture 17-Antibiotic Resistance

Lecture 17-Antibiotic Resistance - Lecture 17 Bacterial...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 17- Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance Penicillin- A naturally occurring antibiotic; discovered by Alexander Fleming- Kills bacteria by interfering with the ability to synthesize cell wall (vancomycin does this too) Antibiotic- An organic compound that can inhibit the growth of microbes (eg, bacteria, etc)- Can occur naturally; example: penicillin is produced by a fungus. Can be synthetically produced- Credited with curing many diseases, including: - Staph infection, Staphylococcus aureus- Tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis- Pneumonia, Streptococcus pyogenes- Syphilis, Treponema pallidum-Bacteria are prokaryotes; divide very rapidly (every 20 mins), and therefore can kill very rapidly Modes of Action- Stop bacterial growth- Knock out protein synthesis: no DNA replication will kill the cell- Knock out ribosome function: no proteins- Stop cell wall formation (penicillin, vancomycin) Antibiotic Resistance- Some bacteria become insensitive to antibiotics; growth, protein production, cell wall formation,...
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This note was uploaded on 04/04/2009 for the course BIOLOGY 1222 taught by Professor Haffie during the Spring '09 term at UWO.

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Lecture 17-Antibiotic Resistance - Lecture 17 Bacterial...

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