Lecture 24- Respiration 2

Lecture 24- Respiration 2 - Lecture 24- Respiration 2- e-...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Lecture 24- Respiration 2- e- means electron flow- Oxygen is the terminal electron acceptor of respiration- Q= ubiquinone; Cyt C= Cytochrome C Why do the electrons move? - As the chain continues, any one component has a stronger affinity for electrons than the preceding one- Oxygen is at the end of the chain; it drives the process because of its affinity for electrons- To start, NADH has a negative redox potential; it is very easy to oxidize- Electron flow is spontaneous, no energy (ATP) required Chemiosmosis- Linking the proton gradient to work- Peter Mitchell came up with chemiosmosis: during protein transport, protons move from the matrix to intermembrane space (providing potential energy)- Proton Motive Force- Charge difference- Concentration difference The Electron Transport Chain B ATP yield- Each NADH yields 3 ATP- Each FADH2 yields 2 ATP-Electron transport can occur very fast; high respiration, NADH production- No ATP will be produced with an uncoupler Uncouplers- Iohophores: an uncoupler that provides a path for H+; uncouples H+ flow with synthesis of ATP;...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 04/04/2009 for the course BIOLOGY 1222 taught by Professor Haffie during the Spring '09 term at UWO.

Page1 / 5

Lecture 24- Respiration 2 - Lecture 24- Respiration 2- e-...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online