BIO2 - Andrea Cooper Tuesday 1:15 pm Stephen Campbell Deep...

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Andrea Cooper Tuesday 1:15 pm Stephen Campbell Deep Sea Trouble Deep sea fisheries are becoming a problem because the populations of fishes are decreasing greatly. Many species that live far under water are becoming close to extinct because of the global demand for seafood. The ocean is an incredibly large body of water. The part of the ocean that is considered the deep sea is from the surface of the continental shelf to the seafloor. This can be anywhere from 600 to 60,000 feet. The seafloor consists of different depths known as the continental slope, the continental rise, and the abyssal plain. Trenches are found in the abyssal plain and may be as deep as 30,000 feet. Most deep sea fishing occurs in the area of the continental slope. The demand for seafood has increased over time because populations of shallow-water fish have gone down dramatically. This led to fisheries looking for other places to fish, therefore, leading them to the deep sea. The fish found in the area where most fishing occurs are larger and more
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This note was uploaded on 04/29/2008 for the course BIO 111 taught by Professor Curtis during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Cortland.

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BIO2 - Andrea Cooper Tuesday 1:15 pm Stephen Campbell Deep...

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