bee 4 - Siming Zhu February 15, 2009 BEE 3299 Assignment...

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Siming Zhu February 15, 2009 BEE 3299 – Assignment 4.1 Part 1: The attributes of the subcomponents that collectively make up Lake Cayuga’s ecosystem are many and various, including biotic as well as abiotic factors. The biotic features of the lake include many of the residential species, organisms and plants. For example, the biotic factors include the plants (algae) that can be found at the bottom of the lake, as well as the many fish species and the (almost) invisible microorganisms that are constantly moving about in the water. On the other hand, the abiotic features of lake Cayuga include the actual water that is in the lake, the rocks around and at the bottom of the lake, as well as the physical attributes of the water (and the surroundings) itself. These physical attributes include the tide, the wind around/on the lake and the depth of the water. Another attribute of the lake Cayuga ecosystem is the exchange of matter and energy between its components. Depending on the season, the weather around the lake will affect the temperature of the water in the lake as well as the surface movement of the water. For examples, in the winter the water will be extremely cold (maybe frozen) and if it is a windy day, then the tide will be substantially stronger. When it is a nice day, the sun will shine on lake Cayuga and raise the temperature of the water. Within the water, the exchange of matter and energy continues as the many fish species eat each other, the plants at the bottom of the lake and the tiny microorganism that are constantly floating around. In order to obtain energy, the plants in lake Cayuga must absorb nutrients from the sun, water and soil at the bottom of the lake. Since the Lake Source Cooling (LSC) system operates in lake Cayuga, this implies the lake will be warmer than usual due to the release of heat from the warm water that is returned into the lake. The heat released into the lake via the warm water from the LSC project will raise the temperature of the entire lake as well as change the chemical and mineral makeup of the water, which will undoubtedly negatively affect the many fish species and plants that were accustomed to living under different temperatures and conditions. The most direct impact of the LSC project’s interaction with lake Cayuga is to raise the temperature of the water. As the water temperature increases, the level of oxygen and other important nutrients will change. According to the reading from the Marietta website, an increase in water’s concentration of phosphate (which can be caused by temperature change) can have detrimental effects on the fish and plant species living in the water. For example, extremely high levels of phosphate in the water will cause an overgrowth of algae,
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This note was uploaded on 04/05/2009 for the course BEE 3299 taught by Professor Scott,n.r. during the Spring '07 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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bee 4 - Siming Zhu February 15, 2009 BEE 3299 Assignment...

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