BEE hw 5 - 1. In 1999, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)...

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1. In 1999, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in conjunction with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Energy Information Administration (EIA) produced a report which outlined the specific factors behind CO2 emissions in the United States. In the report, it was estimated that CO2 emissions ensuing from the generation of electricity reached 2,245 million metric tons; a dramatic increase of 1.4 percent (30 million metric tons!) from the previous year. What accounts for this increase? What can be done to avoid further increases in CO2 emissions from the U.S, specifically from the generation of electricity? The 30 million metric tons increase in CO2 emissions from electricity generation during 1999 resulted from a combination of an increase in demand for electricity and a change the in source of electricity. First, there was an increase in demand for electricity due to favorable economic conditions that included a 4.2% increase in the nation’s GDP. During 1999, electricity consumption increased by 1.7% while the average price of electricity decreased by 2.1%.
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This note was uploaded on 04/05/2009 for the course BEE 3299 taught by Professor Scott,n.r. during the Spring '07 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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BEE hw 5 - 1. In 1999, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)...

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