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exam 2 - Name A g i Section CHEM 105 Exam 2 Thursday March...

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Unformatted text preview: Name A g i Section CHEM 105 Exam 2 Thursday March 6, 2008 (out of 69) h = 6.626 x 10'34 J s c = 2.998 X108 m/s R = 1.0974 x107 m“ lnm=1o‘9m (1) (9 pts) Matching (match the word to the thermodynamic definition): £System, C_Surrounding, ,1; Process, 6; Work, hEnergy, CL___ Heat, aiExothermic, iEndothermic, QState—function \ a. energy transfer between system and surroundings as a result of a temperature change only b. a function describing a property of the system which does not depend on the path the system takes everything in the universe except the system =- 9 a process that absorbs energy as heat energy transferred when an object is moved by a force the part of the universe which we have special interest in a process that releases energy as heat rapt-hp . the systems capacity to do work i. thermodynamics is concerned with energy changes that accompany this (2) (5 pts) Matching (match the word to the quantum mechanical definition): a[_ Uncertainty Principle, L Quantization, a Wavefunction, ide Broglie waves, Q Probability a. under certain situations electrons can exhibit wave-like properties b. only certain energies are allowed in the system the likelihood of obtaining a particular measurement d. both the position and momentum of a particle can not be precisely known at the same time c. arises from solutions of the Schrodinger equation (3) (9 pts) When a 30.0 g sample of ice at—lS.0°C is dropped into an insulated container holding 100.0 g of an unknown liquid at 25.4°C, the final temperature after thermal equilibrium is reached is measured to be 106°C. What is the specific heat capacity of the unknown liquid? em = 2.06 J/g°C, cwater = 4.184 J/g°c, AHjm (H20) = 333 J/g. 12,244.; -. No.0 C = O 2.1%? § - 31—4” =~ Y 2 it 3‘ “c, C ” i '+ 20. o /3 Rhc (4) (5 pts) Given that the energy levels of the hydrogen atom are given by En = ——- ,where n2 R is the Rydberg constant, determine the energy ad wavelength of the light required to excite a hydrogen atom from its ground state to the level with n=10. .. «*RL‘Q “‘ch _. A l ___ L A6" 2.. ~"< ‘13-. Rhc.(ro3~ l7.» l0 2 *(toawmq'm :ywzo xco Mrs)(2‘i‘i9xlo m/s >630 I) 31 G? X 10 AE hi) l\ C 1 be (6,326 xm’w )(Zfl‘ii? 36/03) 21‘. :1 2 .—-—--—‘ : 7 “5 02.192 surf“ ' -9 2. 92.o§ x10 m :L QLO§ M1 (5) (5 pts) Consider the reaction of aqueous lead nitrate with aqueous sodium chloride. (a) Write the balanced chemical equation. (b) What volume (in mL) of 0.75 M lead nitrate is required to completely react with 1.00 L of 2.25 M sodium chloride solution? 1.001.>< 2.13 ""0 ’O‘C‘Q Y “We PLCN03)z. : H2; mare (319000332, L- .) wa MACQ “2?an 950002075 X ,1}...— : LS‘OL pL(UO3)L 0,Q~§Mu€ 1—“5‘00 mL‘ (6) ( 6 pts.) If the de Broglie wavelength (A = ~£) of an electron is 555 nm: WIV .(a) What is its velocity? (Note: the mass of an electron is 9.1 x 10'31 kg) in. _~ aczc. xno’z‘l'ys 1317. m(s (b) If a proton were traveling at the same velocity, what would its wavelength be? (Note: the mass ofaproton is 1.67>< 10'27 kg) , A (9.025 )(‘O’3$T5 _‘ 3‘02. XID’JO m A "’ mV '" f . , (ML ~x«b‘“1agh(t:sx z mls) 2:. 0.301 nm (c) Which particle, the electron or the proton, would be more energetic and why? Pm‘lmn (s mam €41th E 3 219‘ 6L Halter XE. =— 3:10ng ’A k s ESlwr‘it/k SJ“ pm’hm \mafih QR pro—hm (7) (9 pts) Determine the enthalpy of reaction for N2 (g) + 02 (g) —> 2N0 (g) using the following two thermochemical equations N2 (g) + 3H2 (g) —> 2NH3 (g) 4N0 (g) + 6H20 (g) -> 4NH3 (g) + 502 (g) and that AH; for H20 (g) = —24l.8 kJ/mol. NL'l" 3HL —3> 2N9} 2Nn3+ §oL A ,wo +3910 ism Mantel: 3H,_o A» aauizoz N1 +02 ——>> 2N0 AH” = —91.8 kJ/mol AHm = +9062 kJ/mol (8) (8 pts) One can use a device called a bomb calorimeter to determine heats of combustion for many substances. In such a device, the volume is held constant and the pressure is allowed to change during a chemical reaction. During this particular experiment 3.30g of C6H1206 (s) is introduced into the bomb calorimeter, the bomb calorimeter is then purged with oxygen, and placed in a water bath containing 850. g of water, which is insulated from the surroundings (no heat transferred to the surroundings). The sample is then completely burned to produce C02 and water. The temperature of the water bath increases by 11.70 C, the heat capacity of the bomb is 0.843 M / 0C, and the specific heat capacity of the water is 4.184 J/g °C. (a) Determine AE" system ’9 ° AG“ ° 0 Aesas'lm ’ CMLuS'l’to- +‘ AEPmO + 256‘ 56ml; ’ (b) Determine the constant volume heat of combustion for C6H1206 per mole. o s _ A 505%”ka " 3cm” .. (2%" +4 25°“) 2. -- (Smalflxw T/a'M‘L’VQ + (Mgr/ocquZ) .. “5‘413 j“ 2. ~94? £2? per 3.303, 336% WQ (““20“ =. 0,0123% my? PXOJG; fl” -514? it? ; 993310 WW6 a AE’Wlmsi’tm a 0.0l8’3i7i'm'e (9) (13 pts) The Schrodinger equation for the hydrogen atom is given by: HH_at0m\pH_atom = EH-atomWH-atom. Where WH-atom is the wavefunction (or orbital), and EH_atom is the energy associated with a specified atomic orbital. (a) To completely specify WH_at0m you need to express three quantum numbers (excluding spin). What are their symbols and what are their names (use the terminology from our lecture). n ’5. Princcflei .n. Q 3.- aglmtkila—Q 2,,4. or anaukt‘ meme-«414m 5.“. ML :3. Mazme‘bc 3-1/1. (b) How many possible orbitals are there in an n = 3 level? 2. 2. Cl 2» 2' A '3 éQ—va 9‘79 X 9&93 x 360,21— 2002(2 L ...
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