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230S09Lecture5 - Aristotles Poetics II Aristotle Lysippos c...

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    Aristotle’s  Poetics  II Aristotle , Lysippos, c. 330 BC
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    Definition of Tragedy “Tragedy, then, is a representation of an  action which is serious, complete, and of a  certain magnitude - in language which is  garnished in various forms in its different  parts - in the mode of dramatic enactment,  not narrative - and through the arousal of pity  and fear effecting the  katharsis  of such  emotions” (p.492).
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    What is catharsis? Often translated as  “purging” Unclear meaning Aristotle is arguably not  entirely explicit that this  is a  benefit  of tragedy  (as oposed to side  effect) Possibly: humbling,  sensitizing Data: consumers of  fiction are more morally  sensitive Crying Girl , Roy Lichtenstein 1964
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    Plot A “whole” plot has: Beginning (no causal link to  preceding event) Middle (entailed by beginning) End (entailed by middle, nothing  further implied) “appropriate scale” - we need  to be able to appreciate unity. “A story should have a beginning, a  middle, and an end... but not  necessarily in that order” - Jean-Luc  Godard Jean-Luc Godard
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    Unity of Plot A life is not a plot Not episodic - each part  necessary to unified  whole A life story recorded in 
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