Introduction to Saga - Introduction to SagaLegends and...

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Introduction to Saga- Legends and Sagas are rooted in history (even if they are fantastical) Art- the heroes depicted in art have to be narrative, they have to be doing something, some action Gods are timeless and placeless, however, for heroes they are rooted in their hometowns and city states The biggest exception is Heracles, he is a hero in all places Etiological Myth- Allegory- Max Muller Myths are metaphors for natural phenomena Psychology- Sigmund Freud and the Oedipus complex Carl Jung and the collective unconscious Greek sagas have the previous but they have much broader role in terms of social identity Unlike the gods who are universal the heroes of Classical saga are undeniably greek. Myth and Society James Frazer Help understand ritualistic behavior It’s a shorthand way to understand Structuralism- Claude Strauss Myth is a mode of communication Walter Burket- Synthezied structural and traditional approaches Some myths change over time to suit society needs Vladimir Propp
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This note was uploaded on 04/06/2009 for the course TRAD Classical taught by Professor Schon during the Spring '09 term at University of Arizona- Tucson.

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Introduction to Saga - Introduction to SagaLegends and...

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