Chapter 9-Visual - Visual Imagery Chapter 9 What Is...

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Visual Imagery Chapter 9
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What Is Imagery? What’s It For? Imagery is an internal event Difficult to tease out knowledge from visual images Imagery and elaboration Visual imagery is “seeing” in the absence of visual stimulus Athletes and imagery
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Imagery in the History of Psych Early ideas about imagery Wilhelm Wundt Elements of Consciousness: sensations, feelings, images Since images accompany thoughts, images were a good way to study thinking Imageless-thought debate Aristotle “thought is impossible without an image” Others argue thinking can occur without images Debate ended with rise of behaviorism
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Imagery and Cognitive Revolution Advancement: Early research: concrete nouns resulted in better memory than abstract Shepard (1967): recognition accuracy for visual material very high 612 pictures at self-pace 2 hours later (almost 100% accurate); 1 week later (87% accurate) Words resulted less accurate at 2 hours and 1 wk Standing (1973) research: 1000 words (614), 1000 ordinary pictures (770), 1000 vivid pictures (880)
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Research led to dual-coding theory Research with mental chronometry Compare 2 objects demonstration Compare orientation Relationship between reaction time and orientation were linearly related Importance: demonstrated parallel between imagery and perception. This parallel suggests that perhaps imagery and perception share the same mechanisms
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Imagery and Perception Recognize that imagery and perception are different in that mental images are not as vivid or long-lasting as perception, but they do share similar properties Spatial analogs, i.e., the spatial experience for both imagery and perception match the layout of the actual stimulus Evidence comes from Kosslyn’s research using the image scanning task
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Kosslyn’s Image-Scanning Experiments
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Chapter 9-Visual - Visual Imagery Chapter 9 What Is...

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