Phys 0175 - Lecture 2

Phys 0175 - Lecture 2 - Lecture 2 (Jan. 7, 2008): Chapter...

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Lecture 2 (Jan. 7, 2008): Coulomb’s Law Coulomb’s Law vs. Law of Gravitation Illustrative examples Conductors and insulators Superconductors and semiconductors Induced charges Shell theorems, along with an illustrative example Chapter 21 (continued):
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Coulomb’s Law: The magnitude of the electric force between two point charges q 1 and q 2 that are separated by a distance r is given by the equation: 1 2 2 q q F k r = k = 8.988 x 10 9 N•m 2 /C 2 (in S.I. units) Direction of F: Attractive if the charges are opposite Repulsive if the charges are alike
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Torsion balance used to measure the electric force: Like charges repel Unlike charges attract
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The constant k that appears in Coulomb’s Law is often expressed in terms of another, more fundamental constant ε 0 which is called the permittivity of free space (i.e. vacuum): 9 9 2 2 0 12 2 2 0 1 8.988 10 9.0 10 / 4 8.854 10 / k N m C C N m πε ε - = = × 2245 × ⋅ → = × ⋅
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Phys 0175 - Lecture 2 - Lecture 2 (Jan. 7, 2008): Chapter...

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