Phys 0175 - Lecture 16

Phys 0175 - Lecture 16 - Lecture 16(Feb 18 2009 Chapter 26...

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Lecture 16 (Feb. 18, 2009): Chapter 26: Current and Resistance Ohm’s Law Illustrative examples Power in electric circuits More examples
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Ohm’s Law: Q: How does the current i through a device depend on the potential difference V applied across the device? Ohm’s Law asserts that the current i is always directly proportional to the potential difference V. A conducting device obeys Ohm’s Law when the resistance of the device is independent of the magnitude and polarity of the applied potential difference. (V/i = R = constant) (V/i)=constant (V/i) constant
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Two pieces of cylindrical wire A and B are soldered together end-to-end. Wire A is made of copper (ρ Cu =1.69E-8 Ωm) and has a diameter d A =4.00mm); wire B is made of iron Fe =9.68E-8 Ωm) and has a diameter d B =2.50mm). Both wires have length L=2.50m. When a current I=35.0A is passed through this combination, what will be the potential differences between points 1 and 2, and points 2 and 3? 2.50m
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This note was uploaded on 04/06/2009 for the course PHYS 0175 taught by Professor Koehler during the Spring '08 term at Pittsburgh.

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Phys 0175 - Lecture 16 - Lecture 16(Feb 18 2009 Chapter 26...

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