2009_rnr_384_rangeland_management_lecture_notes

2009_rnr_384_rangeland_management_lecture_notes - RNR 384:...

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Sheet1 Page 1 RNR 384: Spring 2009 Principles of Natural Resource Management Rangeland Management Practices Mitch McClaran Professor of Range Management 112 Biological Sciences East, 621-1673 mcclaran@u.arizona.edu Office Hours 1-2PM Tuesdays and 9-10 Thursdays or by appointment Lecture Schedule 13 Feb Fri Rangelands A. ecosystem components B. concerns C. management practices D. rangeland management discipline 16 Feb Mon Rangeland Plant Response to Herbivory A. growth patterns and meristems B. intensity, season, kind of defoliator, and neighboring plants
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Sheet1 Page 2 18 Feb Wed Rangeland Herbivore Production A. forage quantity and the animal unit concept B. forage quality and diet selection 20 Feb Fri Rangeland Herbivore Management A. principles B. distribution tools C. estimating stocking rate and grazing capacity 23 Feb Mon Monitoring and Evaluating Rangeland Condition A. goals and system design B. traditional monitoring and evaluation design C. new approaches Obtain LECTURE NOTES (including 2008 exam) from Library Course Reserves, using O Lecture 1. Rangelands a. ecosystem components b. concerns c. management practices d. range management discipline Ecosystem Components: password hrangelandsh
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Sheet1 Page 3 atmosphere: greenhouse gases soils: generally low fertility and shallow, plants: generally herbaceous and/or shrubby, few trees (<20ft3/acre/yr) herbivores: wild and domestic carnivores: wild and domestic humans: private, communal and/or public based-decisions about allocation of resources Extent of Rangelands: about 50% of land surface, and about 50% of that is grazed by livestock Table from from Asner et al. 2004. Rangeland Concerns: Atmosphere - temperature - precipitation Soil - basis for primary production - erosion is source of water pollution Plants - basis for herbivores - supports human needs and desires
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Sheet1 Page 4 Herbivores - basis for carnivores - supports human needs and desires Carnivores - some herbivore control - supports human needs and desires Humans - health - security - wealth and equity Livestock use of low productivity (arid) and high productivity (mesic) lands differes between developed and developing countries (Table 4 and Map 4 from FAO 2006). Implications for future land uses as mesic areas are converted to cropland.
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This note was uploaded on 04/06/2009 for the course RNR 384 taught by Professor Follset during the Spring '09 term at University of Arizona- Tucson.

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2009_rnr_384_rangeland_management_lecture_notes - RNR 384:...

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