lab 10001 - ECEN 2250 - CircuitslElectronics 1 Goals of...

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Unformatted text preview: ECEN 2250 - CircuitslElectronics 1 Goals of this Lab Introduction PreLab Work Lab Experiments Lab worksheet Introduction to schematics and some standard schematic symbols. Learn about batteries, switches, wires, buzzers, lamps, LEDs, and diodes as circuit elements. Learn about polarity of certain circuit elements. Build real circuits from schematics and test them. Design and build a circuit that solves a specified problem. 1. Introduction---READ THROUGH BEFORE STARTING WITH THE PRE-LAB & THE EXPERIMENTS--- Schematics are to electrical engineers what scores are to musicians. Although it is possible to improvise in both disciplines, most serious work needs to be documented in such a way that it can be implemented again by another team with basic knowledge of the subject. When you design, build and analyze electronic circuits, one of your first actions should always be to draw a schematic, either of the whole system or, as your circuits become more complex, of one or more subsystems. Most circuit elements are standardized (in the US by the ANSI, the American National Standards Institute) and whenever possible you should use the standard symbols. Some very common circuit symbols are shown below 1 Voltage source Current source The three sources are independent sources. For a first cut, you can think of the battery and the independent voltage source as being the same thing. As we'll see later, though, a battery actually has a slightly different i-v characteristic than an ideal voltage source. The ground symbol is used to show a special point in the circuit - either the "ground" connection to the power supply or an actual "Earth ground" (meaning, literally, a connection to the Earth's surface). In some circuits, e.g. circuits with Operational Amplifiers you MUST show where the power supply ground connection is (as we will see later). In other circuits, it is not important to show the ground. It is important to realize that any two points shown connected to a ground symbol can be thought of as being physically wired together. Thus, the two circuits below are the same (the squiggly things are resistors - see below)....
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lab 10001 - ECEN 2250 - CircuitslElectronics 1 Goals of...

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