Employee_Selection_Study_Note - EMPLOYEE SELECTION STUDY...

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EMPLOYEE SELECTION STUDY NOTE STUDY NOTE I. MATCHING PEOPLE AND JOBS Those who are responsible for making selection decisions should have adequate information on which to base them. Organizations try to maximize their accurate predictions (hits) and minimize their inaccurate ones (misses). A. Person-Job Fit: Beginning with Job Analysis Job analysis provides the basis for determining what types of information should be obtained from the applicant, from previous employers, and from other sources. Review the major points in the H ADM 2211 textbook relating to job descriptions and specifications (see pages 142-143; 151-154). B. Person-Organization Fit In addition to the job requirements, many organizations place a priority on finding individuals that meet broader organizational requirements. In some instances
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managers will pass up potential employees if they don’t embrace the values of the organization. C. The Selection Process Figure 6.2 below (H ADM 2211 textbook, p. 246) shows the major steps in the selection process D. Obtaining Reliable and Valid Information Reliability describes the degree to which interviews, tests, and other selection procedures yield comparable data over a period of time. For example, if an interviewer judges the capabilities of a group of applicants differently today than yesterday, his or her judgment is unreliable. Reliability can also be determined by interrater reliability or agreement between two or more raters. Selection decision data that are unreliable cannot be used as predictors of job success. Validity refers to what a selection procedure measures and how well it measures it. For personnel selection, validity indicates the extent to which data from a selection procedure are predictive of job performance or other relevant criteria. In order for a test to be valid, it must also be reliable. However, reliability does not assure validity. Note: Steps may vary. An applicant may be rejected after any step in the process. Completion of application Initial interview in HR department Employment testing (aptitude, achievement) Background investigation Preliminary selection in HR department Supervisor/team interview Medical exam/drug test Hiring decision
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II. SOURCES OF INFORMATION ABOUT JOB CANDIDATES In a survey of 201 HR executives, participants were asked which selection methods produce the best employees. The mean rating for nine methods on a 5-point scale (1 = not good, 3 = average, 5 = extremely good): Work samples 3.68 References/recommendations 3.49 Unstructured interviews 3.49 Structured interviews 3.42 Assessment centers 3.42 Specific aptitude tests 3.08 Personality tests 2.93 General cognitive ability tests 2.89 Biographical information blanks 2.84 A. Application Forms It is quite common for employers to use application forms that are in violation of FEP legislation. The HR manager should check all application forms periodically. Note that some companies use a weighted application blank that tries to distinguish between
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2009 for the course H ADM 211 taught by Professor Sway during the Fall '07 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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Employee_Selection_Study_Note - EMPLOYEE SELECTION STUDY...

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