lect 13 - Catabolism (aka breakdown, degradation) Learning...

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Unformatted text preview: Catabolism (aka breakdown, degradation) Learning goals Understand the basic chemical principles that govern biological reactions Understand the core reactions of central metabolism shared by many organisms Learn the reactions of central metabolism, common to almost all living things. Energy Reducing power Goals of catabolism To generate and store: Which one of the abbreviations shown below identifies one reducing equivalent? A. 2e- B. 2H+ C. H2 D. NADH E. FADH2 Photophosphorylation Respiration (oxidative phosphorylation) Fermentation (substrate level phosphorylation Synthesis of ATP from ADP coupled to the catabolism of energy-rich metabolites Energy generating systems Click to edit Master subtitle style I MPORTANT reaction patterns Which microbes carry out fermentation? Microbes that lack an electron transport system; a membrane- associated electron sink that recycles reduced electron carriers What is the chief difference between fermentation and respiration? Respiration - substrate is fully oxidized Fermentation - substrate is partially oxidized Why is the substrate only partially oxidized during fermentation? To generate the electron sinks needed to recycle electron carriers Use of a substrate as the source of reducing power and as the source of an electron sink is referred to as substrate disproportionation Fermentation Click to edit Master subtitle style Operational definition of fermentation Click to edit Master subtitle style Reactions coupled to SLP Click to edit Master subtitle style Energy-rich metabolites involved in SLP Click to edit Master subtitle style Cartoon of fermentation Click to edit Master subtitle style I MPORTANT reaction patterns Glycolytic pathways...
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lect 13 - Catabolism (aka breakdown, degradation) Learning...

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