{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

1.greek.krauss.cajk.drac - Liter at ure in Trans lat ion...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Literature in Translation 248:  Vampire in Literature and Film More Folklore… On our way to Dracula’s Castle…
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
“South Slavic Countermeasures  against Vampires” This essay by folklorist Friedrich Krauss investigates the numerous methods  from South Slavic cultures that may be used as protective measures to defend  oneself from vampires. His definition of vampire is “a dead person who comes  to life during the night-time” (p67). As a folklorist, Krauss tries to impose a sort  of scientific investigation upon magical narratives. Krauss emphasizes the importance of ‘killing’ the corpse again; in this way, the  spirit is freed and can no longer cause harm. If the body is demobilized (through  staking, etc), the spirit will not be able to find its way back to the corpse. In light  of this, connections have been made between a vampire’s spirit and a moth or a  snake; if one is seen escaping the body, the vampire may continue to live. The  moth ties to the immateriality of the spirit and the snake ties to images of the  underworld. These ideas point to the belief of the supremacy of the spirit over the body. In  many cases, the body is mutilated or burned in order to save the spirit. This  ‘double-killing’ is an important symbolic act when dealing with vampires in  South Slavic cultures, as it purifies the soul from any possible demonic  connection.
Background image of page 2
“South Slavic Countermeasures  against Vampires” (cont.) Another of Krauss’s contributions is the connection between the vampire and  blood feuding. Blood is a metaphor for familial bonds; the spilling of blood in a  feud demands a sacrifice of blood as payment. Many peasants believe that the  spirit of a murdered relative cannot rest until the death is avenged. If this does  not occur, there is a risk of the victim becoming a vampire. Though they can occur throughout the Southern Slavic countries, blood feuds  are most common in Montenegro and Albania. In southern Italy, they are known  as  vendetta. “Ko se ne osveti, taj se ne posveti” (“the one who does not take revenge, will  never become hallowed”). This Serbian phrase represents the traditional views  towards family blood ties that lead to blood feuding. If a murdered family  member is not avenged, the spirit is somehow unholy and may become a  vampire. This phrase links traditional blood feuding with the vampire.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
“The Killing of a Vampire” Veselin ajkanovi Č ć ’s essay draws heavily from folklore collections of Vuk Karadži ć , a modern Serbian linguist and “father of the Serbian language” (he reformed the language and standardized the Cyrillic alphabet).
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}