vampire 1 - Vampire in Lit and Film Tomislav Longinović...

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Unformatted text preview: Vampire in Lit and Film Tomislav Longinović (Tom-ee-slav Long-ee-no-vich) or call me: Toma tlongino@wisc.edu 262-4311 Introduction Folklore: legend of an ancient human­like being feeding on the life essence of others to perpetuate its own existence after death Literature: gothic writing about the creature during Romanticism Film: modern visual imagination of global cultures permeated by the vampire Books Available at Underground Textbook Exchange 664 State St Required: A.Dundes, The Vampire (1998) A. Ryan, The Penguin Book of Vampire Stories(1989) Gordon&Hollinger, eds, Blood Read (1997) McNally&Florescu, In Search of Dracula (1994) B. Pekic, How To Quiet A Vampire (1978) Recommended Tomislav Longinovic: Vampires Like Us (2005) M. Summers, The Vampire in Lore and Legend (1929) Films F.W. Murnau, Nosferatu (1922), 90 min. T. Browning, Dracula (1931), 75 min. R. Polanski, Vampire Ball (1967), 108 min. W. Herzog, Nosferatu (1979), 124 min. T. Scott, The Hunger (1983), 100 min. F.F. Coppola, Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1992), 130 min. REQUIREMENTS In-Class Midterm (30%); Take-Home Final (30%); Group presentation (30%); Participation (10%) QUESTIONS? Submit questions by email I will take 5-10 minutes during the next class period to answer them Vampire Legend as a Cultural Narrative Multidisciplinary approach: psychology, political science, sociology, forensic pathology, anthropology, literary theory, cultural studies Types of Cultural Narratives: Magical Scientific Nomadic Next Class Read: Katharina M. Wilson, “The Origin of the Word Vampire.” (Dundes 3­11); Forensic Pathology and the European Vampire”, (Dundes 109-142) Film F.M. Murnau, Nosferatu (1922), Act 1. ...
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vampire 1 - Vampire in Lit and Film Tomislav Longinović...

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