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CULF1318 Syllabus - CULF 1318.07 FALL 2007 Race and Gender...

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CULF 1318.07   FALL 2007 NORMAN Race and Gender in Literature MW 3:30-4:45 (MH 208) Instructor: Dr. Doug Norman Office: Premont 217 Email: [email protected] Office Hours: Friday 10:00-1:00 Campus Mail: Box 751 Course Description CULF 1318, an introductory literature course, fulfills three hours of the Cultural Foundations component in the General Education requirements. You will be expected to demonstrate knowledge about an ethnically and culturally diverse selection of fiction, poetry, and drama, including characteristics of these major literary genres and familiarity with some of the cultural conventions that shape and are shaped by works of literature. In this particular section you will read, discuss, and write about literature in English that in some way engages with key concepts of race and gender. We will explore how modern concepts of race and gender both shape and are shaped by works of literature. Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray will serve as an entry into the complex of discourse on race and gender in the late nineteenth century. As these redefinitions were inextricably bound to emerging notions of nationality and sexuality, their intersections with models of race and gender will be of particular interest. As you read the essays, stories, and poems in the anthology, Literature in Gender , you will encounter a variety of approaches to reading with “gender on the agenda” while becoming familiar with many of the critical terms for literary study. After reading the anthology of texts by women writers such as Virginia Woolf, Jamaica Kincaid, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Susan Glaspell, and others, we will look at various poems from Harlem Renaissance and Mart Crowley’s play about an ethnically diverse group of gay men in 1960’s Manhattan.
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