C16 - C1 A GA which is a transition B TG which is a transversion C A single-nucleotide deletion D CG which is a transversion C2 A gene mutation is

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
C1. A. G A, which is a transition. B. T G, which is a transversion. C. A single-nucleotide deletion. D. C G, which is a transversion. C2. A gene mutation is a relatively small mutation that is localized to a particular gene. A chromosome mutation is a large enough change in the genetic material so that it can be seen with the light microscope. This would affect several genes. Genome mutations are changes in chromosome number. C3. It is a gene mutation, a point mutation, a base substitution, a transition mutation, a forward mutation, a deleterious mutation, a mutant allele, a nonsense mutation, a conditional mutation, and a temperature-sensitive lethal mutation. C4. A suppressor mutation suppresses the phenotypic effects of some other mutation. Intragenic suppressors are within the same gene as the first mutation. Intergenic suppressors are in some other gene. C5. A. It would probably inhibit protein function, particularly if it was not near the end of the coding sequence. B. It may or may not affect protein function depending on the nature of the amino acid substitution and whether the substitution is in a critical region of the protein. C. It would increase the amount of functional protein. D. It may affect protein function if the alteration in splicing changes an exon in the mRNA that results in a protein with a perturbed structure. C6. The X rays did not produce a mutation because a mutation is a heritable change in the genetic material. In this case, the X rays have killed the cell, so changes in DNA structure cannot be passed from cell to cell or from parent to offspring. C7. A. Not appropriate, because the second mutation is at a different codon. B. Appropriate. C. Not appropriate, because the second mutation is in the same gene as the first mutation. D. Appropriate. C8. An efficient nonsense suppressor would probably inhibit cell growth because all of the genes that have their stop codons in the correct location would make proteins that would be too long. This would waste cellular energy, and in some cases, the elongated protein may not function properly. C9. A. Silent, because the same amino acid (glycine) is encoded by GGA and GGT. B. Missense, because a different amino acid is encoded by CGA compared to GGA. C. Missense, because a different amino acid is encoded by GTT compared to GAT. D. Frameshift, because an extra base is inserted into the sequence. C10. Here are two possible examples: The consensus sequences for many bacterial promoters are –35: 5 –TTGACA–3 and –10: 5 –TATAAT–3 . Most mutations that alter the consensus sequence would be expected to decrease the rate of transcription. For example, a mutation that changed the –35 region to 5 –GAGACA–3 would decrease transcription. The sequence 5
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/07/2009 for the course BIO 325 taught by Professor Saxena during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

Page1 / 5

C16 - C1 A GA which is a transition B TG which is a transversion C A single-nucleotide deletion D CG which is a transversion C2 A gene mutation is

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online