The_Water_Initiative_032607 - The Water Initiative™ A...

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Unformatted text preview: The Water Initiative™ A Strategic Framework CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION Prepared by McGovern Capital, LLC “Catch the Current ” ® October 6, 2009 October OVERVIEW October 6, 2009 October • Currently, nearly TWO BILLION people lack access to safe drinking water (“potable” water). • With global consumption of water doubling every twenty years, the global rate of potable water consumption is growing at TWICE the human population growth rate. October 6, 2009 3 • THIRTY­ONE countries face chronic drinking water shortages today. • By 2025, it is expected that FORTY­ EIGHT countries will face potable water shortages affecting nearly three billion people. October 6, 2009 4 • DISASTER RECOVERY efforts always require immediate access to potable water: – Hurricane Katrina – December, 2004 Pacific Tsunami • Longer term, GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE and resultant erratic weather patterns may indeed make containment of fresh water even more unmanageable. 5 October 6, 2009 Freshwater Availability (by year) 100.0% 90.0% 80.0% 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% 92.0% 88.0% 63.0% 58.0% 26.0% 11.0% 5.0% 3.0% 6.0% 4.5% 1. 5 % 24.0% 18.0% 1995 2005 2025 2050 Year Relative Sufficiency Stress Scarcity Insufficient Data This chart shows the percentage of countries worldwide that, absent natural disasters, have sufficient amounts of freshwater, experience freshwater stress, and have scarce amounts of freshwater. As shown by the Pacific tsunami and Hurricane Katrina, all bets are off even in the event of natural disasters. In 2005, 4.5% of all countries faced water scarcity. That number will be up to 11% by 2025 and 18% by 2050. October 6, 2009 6 • Water today: four hundred billion dollar ($400,000,000,000) global business. • ’02 ­ ’05: Investors contributed an insignificant one hundred sixty five million dollars ($165,000,000) of private capital focused on water purification and management.* * In fact, of this $165 million in investment funds it is very likely that not all of it was devoted to new technologies to bring fresh potable water to people in need of it. It is likely that at least some of the funds were devoted to the improvement of old technologies in the current inadequate delivery systems in place (i.e. U.S. municipal water treatment plants). October 6, 2009 7 • The current and accelerating world water crisis presents a HUGE OPPORTUNITY. • The absence of private capital in the water sphere is directly related to the lack of visionary skills needed to identify, assimilate and piece together the patchwork of available technologies to solve the world’s potable water problem. October 6, 2009 8 • Waterborne diseases (“WD”) kill • • • approximately five thousand (6,000) children a day (one child dies every 15 seconds). Two million (2,000,000) children per year die from WD. It is estimated that fifty percent (50%) of the world’s hospital beds are occupied by victims of WD. 50% of all people in Developing Countries die of WD. 9 October 6, 2009 Causes of Death Among Children Under 5 Years Old Worldwide 2000-2003 13% 19% Acute repiratory infections Diarrheal Diseases (post-neonatal) HIV/AIDS Malaria 17% 37% 3% 4% 8% Measles Neonatal causes Other Between 2000 and 2003, 17% of all children under the age of 5 died due to diarrheal diseases. The only causes of death that were higher than that were Neonatal causes and Acute Respiratory Infections. Yet, investor dollars and charitable dollars in less prevalent diseases have dwarfed the invested capital in potable fresh water. October 6, 2009 10 THE OPPORTUNITY October 6, 2009 October The crisis makes a compelling case for a multidisciplinary team of professionals dedicated to the mission of delivering breakthrough, affordable and safe drinking water. The Water Initiative™ (TWI) is that team. October 6, 2009 12 The Water Initiative™ Bridge to Effective Water Solutions Research & Development Community: Facilitator Non-Industrial Applications: Local Partners: Go to Market Iterations Aggregator of IP The Water Initiative (TWI) $ Return Core Products Iterations Iterations $ Products at Cost Non-Profit: “Hardware” For Profit: “Software” Non-Profit: Awareness Programs/ Communications Plan October 6, 2009 13 TWI ITERATIVE PROCESS: • • • • • • • Capture feedback from the Marketplace Engage local Partners to Define Needs Adapt to Changing Market Conditions Profile Market Needs and Commonalities Match/Adapt Technologies with local Realities Remain Objective and Agnostic Create VALUE for all Stakeholders 14 October 6, 2009 • TWI’s ability to identify potential breakthrough water technologies; rigorously evaluate them; identify complementary technologies; secure the necessary intellectual property rights, where applicable; and to recommend and implement the most comprehensive total solution is unparalleled. already identified by TWI, there will be many more. one another … therefore, a collaborative approach is key. and may indeed require multi­faceted solutions. • In addition to many early stage water technologies • Each new technology is potentially complementary to • In short, the potable water crisis has many dimensions October 6, 2009 15 • For a filter to be effective against WD it must Tech Fact Checklist M C S have ALL of the following characteristics: – M – Comprehensive MICROBIOLOGICAL – C – low COST to produce and sell so that those poor people most affected can afford (hopefully as low as between $1.00 and $2.00 per month – change in their pockets). – S – Device must be able to SENSOR/monitor its own effectiveness so that the user is aware that the device is working and when it stops working. 16 protection against virtually all bacteria, viruses, and other organisms/particles. October 6, 2009 • TWI focuses initially on “non­industrial” water purification and filtration space and will provide the best (efficacy and value) water solutions for villages, hospitals, schools and households. October 6, 2009 17 THE TWI STRATEGIC VISION October 6, 2009 October AGGREGATE COMPLEMENTARY WATER TECHNOLOGIES AND GO­ TO­MARKET WITH VALUE CREATING CORE PRODUCTS. October 6, 2009 19 • TWI’s team is EXPERIENCED in and has EXTENSIVE CONTACTS in the layers of expertise needed to rollout breakthrough technologies. • Building on its extensive INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY EXPERIENCE and TECHNOLOGY LEADERSHIP role in materials science and ‘nanotechnology’, TWI will launch an extensive review of current and soon to be available technologies, which provide meaningful solutions to the world water crisis. 20 October 6, 2009 • Dozens of different technologies have been identified and are being evaluated. October 6, 2009 21 Carafe­Like Structure Hardware (Razor) October 6, 2009 22 “Software System” Prefilter Micron ­ big particles ­ cluster of bacteria Filter: (hydrophilic) bacteria & virus intercepted and killed (silver compound) Activated Carbon (final “wash”) Sensor Carbon Filter: Fail­Safe: October 6, 2009 23 • TWI’s current vision is that it is also most likely that many of these technologies will be from MATERIALS SCIENCE and NANOTECHNOLOGY, where the TWI team has unique capability. • Nanotechnology is a natural solution to the potable water problem given the size of organisms that infect millions of adults and children per year. October 6, 2009 24 •Working technological solutions to the potable water crisis must be small – VERY SMALL. Bacteria are generally on the micron scale while viruses are generally on the nanometer scale. Indeed, polio viruses can be as small as 25 nanometers. * * A nanometer is one billionth of a meter. To illustrate the smallness of the realm we are discussing, a water molecule is less than one nanometer; and a human hair is approximately one hundred thousand nanometers wide. A micron is 1,000 times the size of a nanometer; 1/25,400ths of an inch; and a beach sand grain is usually from 100 to 2000 microns in size. October 6, 2009 25 • The Water Initiative™ is designed to provide a vehicle to: Identify, EVALUATE and FACILITATE available technologies (“diamonds in the rough”) with the potential of economically solving significant aspects of the potable water crisis, in essence become the database and expert organization for “Window on Water™” solutions to the potable water crisis; ACQUIRE, license, and create complementary and proprietary potable water technologies most suited for given problems and/or regions; OVERSEE and EXECUTE the DISTRIBUTION of core products; COLLABORATE to complement/enhance solutions in all sectors, such as applications for both fresh water purification and desalinization pumping; and In the long term, become the WORLD’S expert and LEADING BRAND(S) in water, providing GOODS AND SERVICES, including without limitation programs, consulting services, awards, and most importantly, products which will be known worldwide for their quality and expertise in analyzing, understanding and solving the world’s drinking water issues. • • • • October 6, 2009 26 The Water Initiative™ Bridge to Effective Water Solutions Research & Development Community: - Universities - Corporations - Entrepreneurs - Laboratories - Governments Facilitator - Commercial Feasibility - Provide $ and/or Stock Non-Industrial Applications: Core Products Iterations Aggregator of IP - Licenses - Acquisitions - Joint Ventures $ Products at Cost The Water Initiative (TWI) $ Return - Household Point of Use (POU) - Hospitals - Schools - Small Iterations Communities up to 50,000 persons Local Partners: - Distributors - Local Companies - “Best of Breed” to achieve Iterations effective market penetration Go to Market - Foundations - Governments - Family Offices Non-Profit: “Hardware” - Individuals - Corporations - Private Equity - Governments For Profit: “Software” Non-Profit: Awareness Programs/ Communications Plan October 6, 2009 27 THE CURRENT STATE OF THE ART Pros Cons Boiling • Kills bacterial, parasitic & viral causes of diarrhea. Effective against most pathogens. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Expensive. Energy intensive. Ineffective against particulate matter. Ineffective against chemical pollutants. Dangerous pathogens are resistant to existing chemical treatments. Ineffective against chemical pollutants. Risks to environment. Risks to end-user. Requires bulky supplies of chemicals must be transported, stored, and used. Ineffective against many pathogens. Ineffective with turbid (i.e. muddy or cloudy) water. Ineffective against chemical pollutants. Ineffective against particulate matter. Ineffective against chemical pollutants. Very complicated to implement. Very expensive to implement. Requires power source, such as electricity or batteries. Produces small quantities of water compared to amounts realistically needed. Effectiveness varies greatly depending upon elements of the filter such as pore size and filter composition. Ineffective against many submicron pathogens and microorganisms. Over time, filters become contaminated allowing unfiltered, contaminated water to pass through to user. Chemical Disinfection • Solar • • • Simple. Low-cost. Effective against many pathogens. Ultraviolet Filtration Devices • Can be effective against particulate matter and chemical pollutants. October 6, 2009 28 • NGO Partner – Sponsor and plan conferences – Sponsor and plan “think tank” meetings – Liaison between TWI and NGO and government organizations • TWI Media October 6, 2009 29 MANAGEMENT October 6, 2009 October The Water Initiative™ Team: • TWI is building a world class team who will enable it to – – – – – – Commercial Research and Development; Academic Research and Development; Government and Philanthropic (NGO); Intellectual Property Management and Protection; Business Marketing and Overall Global Operations; and Social Marketing and Public Relations. achieve all of its goals. These team leaders must be multi­disciplinary and provide complementary skills in the following fundamental areas of execution: October 6, 2009 31 Current Core Management Members: • McGovern Capital (Team Aggregator). • Kevin McGovern, McGovern Capital, CEO & TWI Team • • • • • • • • Captain. Quincy Jones – Honorary Chairman. Pat Garner. Stuart L. Hart. Gene Fitzgerald. Brian Foley. Jarrett McGovern. Phil Minasian. Michael Racanelli. October 6, 2009 32 TWI RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT October 6, 2009 October • TWI is RECRUITING a leading cross discipline (materials science and nanotechnology) TEAM who will drive TWI’s research and development program in conjunction with outside ‘WORLD CLASS’ technology ADVISORS as needed. 34 October 6, 2009 • The TWI technology team will include representatives • from the international commercial and academic community. They will have expertise from areas such as: – Nanotechnology (including nanofiber and nanoporous technology); – Nanoporous and Nanofiltration; – Filtration Science; – Monitoring and Sensor Technologies; – Materials Science; – Microbiological Interception (bacterial and viral); – Non­Industrial and Personal Scale Delivery Systems and Design; and – Packaging and manufacturing sensors and quality control systems. 35 October 6, 2009 International Developments • • • • • • India Singapore Mexico Thailand Sweden Israel 36 October 6, 2009 Proposal October 6, 2009 37 Use of Initial Proceeds: • • • • • Due Diligence Research & Development Administrative Preliminary Studies & Misc. Media/Documentary/Programs October 6, 2009 38 Time Table • First 12 months: Due Diligence/Research and • • Development Next 12 months: Acquisitions, Licensing, Studies Next 2­5 years: “Go to Market” October 6, 2009 39 CAPITAL STRUCTURE • TWI currently anticipates two classes of ownership interests with certain rights as generally described below: – Investor Interests/Shares: Investor shares will have preferred distribution rights whereby the amount of their contributions will be completely returned before any other distributions are made by TWI. – Management Shares and Advisory Shares: Management Shares and Advisory Shares will not be entitled to any distributions until Investor Shares have been paid their preferred distributions. Thereafter, all distributions will be paid on a capital account/pro­rata basis to all shareholders. October 6, 2009 40 CONCLUSION • The global potable water crisis has many dimensions • and many potential solutions. Existing, already identified technologies solve some aspects of the problem; however, there are many other technologies to be evaluated to PROVIDE A COMPREHENSIVE SOLUTION to the world’s insatiable appetite for safe, drinking water. The Water Initiative™ will AGGREGATE COMPLEMENTARY TECHNOLOGIES and go to market with CORE PRODUCTS to solve and FACILITATE the manifold dimensions of the existing and impending world potable water crisis and serve an extraordinary humanitarian purpose in the process. 41 • October 6, 2009 The Water Initiative™ Bridge to Effective Water Solutions Research & Development Community: - Universities - Corporations - Entrepreneurs - Laboratories - Governments Facilitator - Commercial Feasibility - Provide $ and/or Stock Non-Industrial Applications: Core Products Iterations Aggregator of IP - Licenses - Acquisitions - Joint Ventures $ Products at Cost The Water Initiative (TWI) $ Return - Household Point of Use (POU) - Hospitals - Schools - Small Iterations Communities up to 50,000 persons Local Partners: - Distributors - Local Companies - “Best of Breed” to achieve Iterations effective market penetration Go to Market - Foundations - Governments - Family Offices Non-Profit: “Hardware” - Individuals - Corporations - Private Equity - Governments For Profit: “Software” Non-Profit: Awareness Programs/ Communications Plan October 6, 2009 42 ...
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