raguso lecture 34 pdf

raguso lecture 34 pdf - BioNB 221 Lecture 34 Parasitism and...

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BioNB 221, Lecture 34: Parasitism and Signal Evolution 17 November 2008 Robert Raguso, Dept. of NBB Cornell University
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Parasites and their Impact on Behavior (www.urac.org). gsbs.utmb.edu 1. Do parasites alter the behavior of their hosts to complete their life cycles?
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www.paulnoll.com/. ../Home/birds-Finch-House.html Parasites and their Impact on Behavior 2. Do parasites drive the evolution of Reddest, brightest males have lower Mycoplasma Hamilton-Zuk Hypothesis: links female choice and sexual selection for male display with an inverse relationship between parasite load & display intensity
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Parasites and their Impact on Behavior 3. Have parasites (and the need to remove them) driven social evolution & communication? http://www.grg.org/images/Rhesusx2.jpg Grooming: Reduces stress Reinforces alliances Requires communication
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What is a Parasite? Parasites are organisms that benefit from living in close association (internally or externally) with another organism (host), usually at a cost to the host without killing it . Variations on a theme of intimate association (symbiosis): mutualistic if beneficial to host commensalistic if neutral to host exploitatory if detrimental to host (predatory if lethal) Semantic considerations: “Parasitoids” kill hosts: virulent parasites or internal predators? “Ectoparasites” live external to their host (e.g. fleas, ticks) “Endoparasites” live internal to their host (e.g. worms, flukes) Relationships not static: endosymbionts, organelles probably had parasitic origins, less virulent due to vertical transmission. Medical importance: Malaria, Schistosomiasis, Elephantiasis, Leishmaniasis, River Blindness, Sleeping Sickness, Rabies
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What is a Parasite? Parasites are organisms that benefit from living in close association (internally or externally) with another organism (host), usually at a cost to the host without killing it . Variations on a theme of intimate association (symbiosis): mutualistic if beneficial to host commensalistic if neutral to host exploitatory if detrimental to host (predatory if lethal) Salient Features: - Complex Life Cycles - Sterilization and exploitation of host - Dramatic simplification of body plan
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Complex Life Cycles and Body Snatchers Schistosoma haematobium
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2009 for the course BIO 2210 taught by Professor Seeley during the Fall '08 term at Cornell.

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raguso lecture 34 pdf - BioNB 221 Lecture 34 Parasitism and...

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