mgf1107notes6

mgf1107notes6 - Jefferson's method was used to apportion...

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Jefferson’s method was used to apportion the House after the censuses of 1790, 1800, 1810, 1820 and 1830. After the violation of the quota rule was discovered in 1832, a search began for a better method of apportionment. John Quincy Adams, a former President now serving as a member of the House from Massachusetts, proposed an apportionment method that is the mirror image of Jefferson’s. Adams’ method: Find a modified divisor d so that when each state’s modified quota is rounded upward, the sum of the resulting modified upper quotas is the exact number of seats to be apportioned. Example: Repeat problem 2 with Adams’ method and 26 seats. Solution: The standard divisor was 1000 26 000 , 26 = . We need smaller quotas so let’s try dividing by something larger. Let’s try 1080. State Population Quota Upper quota Modified quota (d = 1080) Modified upper quota Modified quota (d= 1110) Mo up qu North 9061 9.061 10 8.389 9 8.163 9 South 7179 7.179 8 6.647 7 6.467 7 East 5259 5.259 6 4.869 5 4.737 5 West 3319 3.319 4 3.073 4 2.990 3 Central 1182 1.182 2 1.094 2 1.064 2 Total 26,000 26 30 27 26 Example: Use Adams’ method to apportion 250 seats among the following 6 states:
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State Population A 1,646,000 B 6,936,000 C 154,000 D 2,091,000 E 685,000 F 988,000 Solution: The total population is 12,500,000 and so the standard divisor is 12,500,000 ÷ 250 = 50,000. We need smaller quotas so let’s
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mgf1107notes6 - Jefferson's method was used to apportion...

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