1_7_09 - CLASSICS 222 NOTES FOR 1/7/09 We went over the...

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CLASSICS 222 NOTES FOR 1/7/09 We went over the syllabus, then addressed the big question: What is mythology? Technically, mythology is the study of myths, though we use mythology as equivalent to myth. We tend to contrast both with reality. For our purposes in this course, we will not deal with the question of whether we consider myths factually true or not. When I use myth, I will do so in a positive sense, NOT in a sense that implies that myth is false. We noted the way in which the Lord’s Supper recreates the Last Supper, and called this a myth in this positive sense. To ask the factual basis of the story may be important in some other context, but it is the wrong question for this course. Instead, we will focus on what such a story tells us about the world view of the people who repeat it. TOWARDS A DESCRIPTIVE DEFINITION OF MYTH There is no one satisfactory definition of myth. But myth has these characteristics: 1) It is a narrative , a story with a beginning, middle and end. 2) It is originally traditional
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1_7_09 - CLASSICS 222 NOTES FOR 1/7/09 We went over the...

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