PSYCH101 - The Scientific Pursuit of Happiness Cornell...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Scientific Pursuit of Happiness Cornell University November 10, 2004
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Negative versus positive topics in psychology journal articles 1887 to 2003 93,381 on “depression” 23,790 on “fear” 242,134 on “treatment” 4,247 on “happiness” 933 on “courage 38,349 on “prevention”
Background image of page 2
Seligman’s “three pillars” of positive psychology: Positive subjective well-being life satisfaction/happiness/optimism Positive strengths and virtues creativity/courage/compassion/integrity/wisdom/self- control/spirituality Positive institutions healthy families/neighborhoods/schools/media A more positive psychology for the twenty-first century?
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
What Is “Subjective Well-Being”? 1. Feeling happy: “Taking all things together, how would you say things are these days — would you say you are very happy, pretty happy, or not too happy?”
Background image of page 4
What Is “Subjective Well-Being”? 2. Thinking life is satisfying: “How satisfied are you with your life as a whole these days?”
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
How Happy Are People? 1. Self-reports are mostly positive
Background image of page 6
Subjective Well-Being 916 Surveys in 45 Nations 1.50 160 160 140 140 120 120 100 100 80 80 60 60 40 40 20 20 0 Average = 6.75 Average = 6.75 on 0 to 10 scale on 0 to 10 scale 2.00 2.00 2.50 2.50 3.00 3.00 3.50 3.50 4.00 4.00 4.50 5.00 5.00 5.50 6.00 6.00 6.50 7.00 7.00 7.50 7.50 8.00 8.00 8.50 8.50
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
10,126 momentary moods reported by 226 SMU students (Watson, 2000) 4.50% 17.30% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% Negative Emotions Positive Emotions % of Time Average Emotion Felt "Very Much" or "Extremely"
Background image of page 8
Students’ language use in natural conversation (>10,000 slices) Matthias Mehl and James Pennebaker at University of Texas
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 10
20% 46% 46% 27% 27% 4% 4% 2% 2% 1% 1% 0% 0%
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Can we trust these self-reports? Are happy people “in denial”? The happiness thermometers may read a little high, yet . . . Self-report measures are:
Background image of page 12
Image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/09/2009 for the course PSYCH 101 taught by Professor Maas, j during the Spring '08 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

Page1 / 57

PSYCH101 - The Scientific Pursuit of Happiness Cornell...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 13. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online