Sept. 17 slides -...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Rule
of
Law
under
the
Legalists,
 
The
Qin
and
Han
Dynas9es
 Today’s
topics
 •  Daoism,
con9nued
 •  Legalism
 •  Qin
and
Han
dynas9es
 Wuwei
and
the
ques9on
of
oppression:
 Hypothe9cal
situa9on
 Because
their
crops
get
more
direct
sunlight,
the
 farmers
on
the
southern,
sunny
side
of
the
 mountain
are
growing
more
crops
and
doing
 beBer
economically
than
the
farmers
on
the
 northern
side
of
the
mountain.
The
southside
 farmers
are
using
their
economic
power
to
build
 a
dam
on
the
river
that
would
divert
more
water
 to
the
southern
side
of
the
mountain.

The
dam
 project
is
star9ng
to
deprive
the
farmers
on
the
 north
side
of
the
water
to
which
they
used
to
 have
free
access.

 Wuwei
and
the
ques9on
of
oppression
 According
to
the
concept
of
wuwei,
which
of
the
 following
is
most
like
the
ac9on
a
king
should
 take
in
this
situa9on?
 a)  Immediately
step
in
and
force
the
farmers
on
 the
southside
to
abandon
the
dam
project
 b)  Implement
a
policy
that

gradually
erases
the
 southside
farmers’
economic
advantage.
 c)  Nothing,
just
let
people
act
out
their
nature
 BuBerfly
or
dream?
 Once
Zhuang
Zhou
dreamed
he
was
a
buBerfly.
 A
buBerfly
fluBering
happily
around—was
he
 revealing
what
he
himself
meant
to
be?
He
 knew
nothing
of
Zhou.

All
at
once
awakening,
 there
suddenly
he
was—Zhou.
But
he
didn’t
 know
if
he
was
Zhou
having
dreamed
he
was
a
 buBerfly
or
a
buBerfly
dreaming
he
was
Zhou.

 Between
Zhou
and
the
buBerfly
there
must
 surely
be
some
dis9nc9on.

This
is
known
as
 the
transforma9on
of
things.

 Daoists
vs.
Confucians:
Comparison
 •  Concept
of
“the
Way”
 •  Concern
with
natural
world
vs.
concern
with
 society
 •  “Uncarved
block”
vs.
classifica9ons
and
 hierarchies
 •  Ac9ve
government
vs.
ac9ve
“non‐ac9on”
 The
Rise
of
the
 State
of
Qin
 •
Qin
dominance
begins
 4th
c.
BCE
 •

Rule
of
Qin
monarchs
 strengthened
by
rulers’
 and
ministers’
use
of
 Legalism
 •
The
formula?

 Powerful
Ruler
+
Clever
 Strategists
+
Military
 Strength
=
Qin
Conquest
 of
the
Warring
States
 Basics
of
Legalism
 •  System
of
prac9cal
methods
and
principles
for
 administering
a
state

 –  not
a
philosophy
or
ideology
 •  Using
laws,
authority
and
techniques
to
control
 human
behavior
for
the
benefit
of
the
state

 –  Importance
of
laws
(where
we
get
the
term
 “Legalism”)
 •  Goal:
achieving
poli9cal
stability
in
a
9me
of
 disorder
 Creators
of
Legalism
 • 
Shang
Yang,
Minister
of
Qin
(4th
c.
 BCE,
aka
“Lord
Shang”)
 • 
Han
Fei,
Qin
advisor
(3rd
c.
BCE,
 “Han
Feizi”)
 • 
Prime
Minister
Li
Si
of
Qin
 The
Policies
of
the
Qin:
 
crea9ng
and
enforcing
unity
 •





Abolished
feudal
nobility,
confiscated
their
land
&
 centralized
government
 •





Outlawed
Confucianism:

“burned
the
books
and
 buried
the
scholars”
 •





Forced
reseBlement
of
people
 •





Standardized
weights,
measures,
script,
roads,
 money
 •





Established
code
of
law
 First
Emperor
of
China:
 Qin
shi
huangdi’s
tomb
 The
legacy
of
the
Qin
dynasty
 •





Cruel
laws
&
punishments
 •





Heavy
taxes,
unfair
labor
burdens
on
commoners
 (public
works
&
warfare)
 •





Aboli9on
of
“feudal”
aristocracy,
confisca9on
of
 land
 •





Standardiza9on
of
money,
weights,
measures,
 roads
 •





Centralized
government
&
proto‐bureaucracy
 •





Emperor
as
all‐powerful
ruler
 Minute
paper
 History
has
tended
to
treat
the
Qin
dynasty
as
a
 dark
9me
in
Chinese
history
and
to
portray
its
 founders
as
ruthless
and
authoritarian.

Much
 of
what
we
know
about
the
Qin
comes
to
us
 by
way
of
later
wri9ngs
from
the
Han
dynasty.

 Can
Han
dynasty
accounts
of
the
Qin
be
 completely
reliable?

Why
or
why
not?

Why
 might
it
have
been
in
the
interest
of
Han
 writers
to
portray
the
Qin
in
such
a
nega9ve
 way?
 ...
View Full Document

Ask a homework question - tutors are online