LS4_a - Unit 1 How do we analyze a system? Modeling and...

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Chemistry XXI Unit 1 How do we analyze a system? Modeling and Measurement
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Chemistry XXI Lab Session 4 How do we use models to derive properties?
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Chemistry XXI Your Challenge Five volatile solvents have been found in different containers in an illegal drugs lab. Based on prior experiences, you infer the potential identity of these substances: Butanone Cyclohexane Ethanol Ethyl Acetate Hexane How can you determine the identity of the solvent in each container?
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Chemistry XXI Modeling Modeling is a powerful tool not only to explain and make predictions about the properties of substances, but to guide the experimental determination of such properties. In lecture, you have been analyzing the particulate model of matter. How can we use it to derive properties useful in the identification of unknown substances?
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Chemistry XXI Ideal Gas Model At low P and T much higher than their boiling point, the behavior of many gases can be modeled assuming that the system is composed of moving, non interacting particles. Why?
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Chemistry XXI Basic Relationships P T P N P V What does the ideal gas model predict? This “ideal” behavior of gases is described by the following relationship: V NT k P = Proportionality Constant Equation of State
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Chemistry XXI Ideal Gas V NT k P = The number of particles in a real sample can be expressed in terms of the mass ( M ) of the system: 1 m M N = Total mass Mass of 1 particle V m MT k P 1 = This relationship could be used to PV MT k m = 1
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Chemistry XXI Basic Relationships The mass of 1 particle is a very small number. Thus, we
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2009 for the course CHEM 151 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at University of Arizona- Tucson.

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LS4_a - Unit 1 How do we analyze a system? Modeling and...

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