Punctuation 1

Punctuation 1 - 1) Use a comma after an introductory clause...

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1) Use a comma after an introductory clause or phrase They are clauses and phrases that function as adverbs telling when, where, how, why, or under what conditions the main action of the sentence occurred. 1) Near a small stream at the bottom of the canyon, the park rangers discovered a mine. (prepositional phrase) 2) When I was ready to iron the dog chewed on the cord. 3) Buried under layers of younger rocks, the earth’s oldest rocks contain no fossils. (participial phrase-describes noun of pronoun) 4) Exception: Short adverbial clause (less than four words). In no time we were at 2,000 feet. 2) Use a comma between all items in a series When three or more items are presented in a series, they should be separated from one another with commas. (words, phrases, clauses) Although some writers view the comma between the last two items as optional, most experts advise using the comma because its omission can result in ambiguity or misreading. 1)
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2009 for the course ENGL 107 taught by Professor Merritt during the Fall '08 term at Arizona.

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Punctuation 1 - 1) Use a comma after an introductory clause...

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