greek myth powell notes

greek myth powell notes - Powell Book Notes 4/4 Chapter 24...

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Powell Book Notes 4/4 Chapter 24 Theories of Myth Interpretation I. Greek Theories wanted to reduce dependence on explanations that used the anthropomorphic categories of Greek religion so prominent in Greek traditional tales thought tales were irrational idealism: belief in values not apparent in the material world Plato believed that irrational stories of Homer and other poets had a corrupting influence b/c they presented a false image of reality Some saw them as allegories: stories that look like one thing on the surface but are really something else inside II. Physical allegory allegory: stories that look like one thing on the surface but are really something else inside physical: ie complete opposites etymology: speculation about the “true meaning of a word” o the meaning of a word or name can reveal the meaning of a myth euhemerism: the thesis that gods once were humans III. Moral Allegory interpretation of myth as a system of advice on good and bad behavior Neoplatonism: believed in higher dimension of reality beyond the limits of time and space, where perfection and absolute truth could be found IV. Medieval and Renaissance Theories V. Theories of the Enlightenment everything traditional was subject to reexamination attacked myth as a product of primitive mental and emotional states VI. Theories of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries romanticism: myth as a vehicle for regaining lost truths “The Interpretation of Dreams” dreams in which someone dies and dreamer feels no grievance conceals the wish to see a certain beloved person again after a long separation dreams in which someone dies and painful affect is felt signifies the wish that the person in question might die, whether in the past or in childhood “Totem and Taboo” no sexual intercourse within the totem totemism children fear animals and view them as closer to them than adults phobias
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4/6 Page 78-100: Myths of Creation, The Rise of Zeus cosmogony: a story that explains the “origin of the world” theogony: a story that explains the “origin of the gods” and their rise to power Eros: “sexual love”, attraction II. The Children of Gaea: The Titans and Their Cousins Titans o Uranus[sky] and Gaea[earth] produced six male and six female Titans o Oceanus o Oceanids Cyclopes Hecatonchires II. Cronus against Uranus Uranus hated his own offspring Cronus, Uranus’ son, chopped off his genitals III. The Birth of Aphrodite, Monsters, and Sea Deities Aphrodite came from the genitals of Uranus that were chopped off by Cronus Aphrodite-goddess of sexual love Sphinx: descendant of Gaea and Pontus IV. Zeus against Cronus: The Battle with the Titans Zeus was born from Cronus Rhea gave Cronus a rock and sent Zeus away, all the children escaped and became gods/goddesses Zeus forced Cronus to vomit out the other children Atlas [titan or giant] was condemned by Zeus to live at the edge of the world,
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greek myth powell notes - Powell Book Notes 4/4 Chapter 24...

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