EE357 Lecture 1 & 2

EE357 Lecture 1 & 2 - Instructor Info Michel Dubois EE...

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EE 357 Lecture 1 Class Introduction & Overview Instructor Info • Michel Dubois – Professor at USC since 1984 – Office: EEB228 – Tel: (213)7404475 • Office Hours – TTh : 1-2PM, EEB 228 – Additional office hours by appointment only • Email: [email protected] • Course Page: http://blackboard.usc.edu Teaching Assistant and Grader TAs : – Sabyasachi Ghosh – Sang Do Grader: – Sim Ji Lee IMPORTANT NOTE: – Any grading dispute should be addressed to a TA first. Relating EE357 To Prior Classes • CS 101,102 – Programming with high- level languages (HLL’s) like C / C++/ Java • EE 101,201 – Digital hardware (registers, adders, muxes) Applications Logic Gates Transistors HW SW SW
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Relating EE357 To Prior Classes Applications System Software (OS, Libraries) Assembly / Machine Code Processor, Memory, I/O Devices Logic Gates Transistors EE 357 • CS 101,102 – Programming with high- level languages (HLL’s) like C / C++/ Java • EE 101,102 – Digital hardware (registers, adders, muxes) • EE 357 – Computer systems • Combine HW/SW – Topics • HW/SW interface • System Software • Assembly Language • Computer Architecture HW SW Future After EE357 EE 357 EE EE 457 EE 454 EE 459 CS BMEN EE 483 Computer Eng. Signal Processing Algorithms EE 477 Circuits CS 402 Operating Systems CS 410 Compilers CS 445 Robotics Embedded Medical Devices CECS EE 357 Course Focus • Focus on assembly language – What are the basic software instructions and how are they used to implement software programs – What hardware is required to implement these instructions • Focus on computer organization/architecture – How to organize HW components (proc., mem., I/O) for functionality and performance • Embedded Systems – Microcontrollers Grading • 9 Homework assignments = 10% • 5 Labs = 30% • 2 Midterms =15% each • 1 Final Exam =25% • Participation=5% – Labs and homework are due on a Friday at 5pm – 20% penalty each late day up to 2 days – Electronic submission and grading
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WARNING CHEATING AND PLAGIARISM WILL NOT BE TOLERATED IN THIS CLASS. ALL ASSIGNMENTS (HOMEWORK AND LABS) MUST BE DONE INDIVIDUALLY. ANY EVIDENCE OF CHEATING IN HOMEWORK, LABS OR EXAMS WILL BE REPORTED AUTOMATICALLY TO STUDENT JUDICIAL AFFAIRS. THE PENALTY FOR ANY ONE INSTANCE OF CHEATING WILL BE AN AUTOMATIC F FOR THE COURSE. MULTIPLE INSTANCES CAN LEAD TO EXPULSION. Organization & Architecture • Computer organization refers to the components and interconnection necessary to form a computer system • Computer architecture provides a view to the programmer on how to access various components • Blurring boundary between architecture and organization • Levels of Architecture – System architecture • High-level HW organization – Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) • Vocabulary that the computer understands and SW is composed of – Microarchitecture • HW implementation for executing instructions History of Computer Architecture Computer architecture has progressed four generations 1. vacuum tubes 2. Transistors 3. Integrated Circuits 4. Very Large-Scale Integrated Circuits
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This note was uploaded on 04/11/2009 for the course EE 357 taught by Professor Mayeda during the Fall '08 term at USC.

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EE357 Lecture 1 & 2 - Instructor Info Michel Dubois EE...

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