physics lab 7 - Atinuke Omolara Physics 1061 Lab Circular...

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Atinuke Omolara Physics 1061 Lab Circular Motion Charles Swartz Objective: To measure the centripetal acceleration and show that it depends on the speed of the object and the radius of the circle. Introduction: An object moving in a circular path at constant speed is undergoing uniform circular motion. This type of motion is everywhere, from a car rounding a curve to the earth orbiting the sun. The dynamical trademark of uniform circular motion is that the force causing the motion is directed toward the center of the circle and it causes a change in the direction of the velocity vector. If the force vanishes, the object would move in a straight-line path tangent to the circle. Such a center-seeking force is called a centripetal force. Centripetal acceleration can be found by using the formula: a c = v 2 t /r, where ac is the centripetal acceleration, v t is the tangential velocity magnitude, and r is the radius of the path the object travels. Newton’s law of motion says F = mdv/dt. In words, the force F causes the velocity of mass m to
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This note was uploaded on 04/12/2009 for the course PHYSICS 1061 taught by Professor Tsankov during the Spring '09 term at Temple.

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physics lab 7 - Atinuke Omolara Physics 1061 Lab Circular...

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