gilg - a ruler begin to change. Initially, Gilgamesh is a...

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Jori Allen-Wilcox September 9, 2008 Intellectual Heritage Kenneth Dossar Lynne Milum’s essay, The Hero’s Journey: A Campbellian Look at the Metaphorical Path to Personal Transformation explains what myths are and what they consist of. The three phases of a myth being separation, initiation and return are what Milum calls “key story elements.” Separation involves the heroic figure leaving his or her comfort zone in order to “pursue a higher calling.” The initiation phase forces the hero into a series of tests which are said to prepare him or her “to pursue the ultimate mythological goal.” Finally, the return stage is essentially the enlightenment where the hero going home to inform others of what he or she has learned during their adventure. One is able to clearly see the three major phases of a myth while reading “The Epic of Gilgamesh,” by Andrew George. Readers see how Gilgamesh goes through the separation phase when his ways as
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Unformatted text preview: a ruler begin to change. Initially, Gilgamesh is a ruthless leader who abuses his power and puts his desires before those of the people; a good ruler leads by example. Eventually, Gilgamesh is led into the initiation phase or the road of trials. His first test is to kill the monster Humbaba. Following this, Gilgamesh is forced to kill the holy bull. One of Gilgameshs greatest test occurs when his friend Enkidu dies. He is forced prevail without Enkidu, the very person who helped him change for the better. Following Enkidus death, Gilgamesh meets Utanapishti who gives him the final test. Gilgamesh is told that he must stay awake for seven days, but he fails. This last test leads into the final phase, the return. Gilgamesh goes to the gods asking for immortality. He realizes that no human is immortal....
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This note was uploaded on 04/12/2009 for the course BIOLOGY 1111 taught by Professor Tanaka during the Fall '09 term at Temple.

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