Chinese calligraphy

Chinese calligraphy - Chinese calligraphy Continuing w/ the...

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Chinese calligraphy Continuing w/ the theme of the importance of writing in Chinese culture Calligraphy was consider more elevated than any art forms of art in Chinese culture Script types: - Regular or block script – no cursiveness. Different styles within the same script type - Walking script - Draft script - Wild cursive - Seal script - Clerical script =archaic, ancient Walking script: beginning of cursive style, can be radically different individual styles, Characters are consistence, balanced, about the same size, the same character looks almost identical Mediocre calligraohy: more random, ill-balanced characters, looks like it’s done almost carelessly Emperor Huizong’s calligraphy was unlike anybody else’s. Gaozong (Huizong’s song) didn’t retain his father’s style after the end of his father’s reign Goals in calligraphy (regardless of script type) - To cultivate a consistent style of brushwork that presents a coherent visual pattern
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This note was uploaded on 04/12/2009 for the course EACS 4A taught by Professor Ji during the Winter '06 term at UCSB.

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Chinese calligraphy - Chinese calligraphy Continuing w/ the...

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