Lesson_15 - RT V n cRT 2 = = Lesson 15 Example 3 A 200-mg...

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Lesson 15 Freezing point depression ( T f )
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Lesson 15 Freezing point depression
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Lesson 15 Freezing point depression An equation similar to the one used to calculate boiling point elevation ( T b ) is used for freezing point depression ( T f ): T f = - iK f m Notice that K f depends only on solvent type.
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Lesson 15
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Lesson 15 Example 1
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Lesson 15 Example 2 The freezing point depression constant for
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Lesson 15 Osmotic pressure
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Lesson 15 Osmotic Pressure: π = h ρ g pure water sugar solution pure water sugar solution h time = 0 equilibrium
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Lesson 15 Isotonic solution 0.92% NaCl(aq) (mass/vol) + NaCl - Hypertonic solution > 0.92% NaCl(aq) Hypotonic solution < 0.92% NaCl(aq) cell expands cell shrinks
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Lesson 15 Van’t Hoff’s equation For ideal solutions: c the molar concentration of solute in solution Van’t Hoff’s equation is similar to the ideal gas law. Why?
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Unformatted text preview: RT V n cRT 2 = = Lesson 15 Example 3 A 200-mg sample of a purified compound of unknown molecular mass is dissolved in benzene and diluted with that solvent to a Lesson 15 Reverse osmosis Desalination of saltwater by reverse osmosis. The membrane is permeable to water but not to ions. The normal flow of water is from side A to side B. If we exert a pressure on side B that exceeds the osmotic pressure of the saltwater, a net flow of water occurs in the reverse direction-from the saltwater to the pure water. The lengths of the arrows suggest the magnitudes of the flow of water molecules in each direction Lesson 15 Suggested readings 13.7 Osmotic Pressure 13.8 Freezing-Point Depression and Boiling-Point Elevation of Nonelectrolyte Solutions...
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This note was uploaded on 04/13/2009 for the course CHEMISTRY 102 taught by Professor Soares during the Spring '09 term at Waterloo.

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Lesson_15 - RT V n cRT 2 = = Lesson 15 Example 3 A 200-mg...

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