Properties of Enzymes lab report

Properties of Enzymes lab report - Maria Tsiolkas...

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Maria Tsiolkas Properties of Enzymes Bio 183L:211 Michele Toney February 4, 2009 February 9, 2009 Meghan Shelton Sara Dantism Natalie Mabrey
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Enzyme Reaction Rate due to entrance of Substrate, Inhibitor, pH, and Temperature Abstract: Properties of Enzymes focused on the variations of reaction rates amongst enzymes subjected to various circumstances such as heat, pH levels, different concentrations of substrate and lastly, the presence of an Enzyme Inhibitor. With the introduction of increased levels of substrate, the reaction times sped up. The inhibitor, hydroxylamine slowed the reaction times down for each concentration when added to the enzyme. From the four temperatures used, the reaction times reactions times worked the quickest at 22 and 38 degrees Celsius. With the introduction of the pH, the enzyme had the fastest reaction time at the 6 and 8 pH’s. To perform the experiment, various beakers filled with the enzyme at the appropriate temperatures were already set out and they were then simply tested using float discs through the use of the reaction between H2O2 and the enzyme. When the reaction occurred, the disc would float to the top of the solution, due to the release of oxygen, and this is to be timed. Introduction: Thousands of complex biological processes are constantly taking place within our bodies. We require material transport, energy synthesis, and the manufacturing of various proteins, hormones, and other molecules. Almost all of these everyday processes rely on the function of enzymes to take place. Enzymes are specifically grouped according to their function, and this information can often provide us with clues regarding what type of reaction that enzyme will catalyze. An enzyme can only react with a very specific type of substrate, which
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binds to the area called the “active site”. After the substrate binds to the active site, an enzyme-substrate complex is created, and then the products are released. The enzyme is never completely consumed from a reaction, and can be reused many times. Both active sites and substrates have very specific shapes, which is why enzymes will only catalyze reactions when they interact with a specific substrate. The function of enzymes can be affected by a variety of factors, including temperature, pH, and enzyme inhibitors, which work by binding to the active site before the substrate can. In this lab, we will investigate how the
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This note was uploaded on 04/13/2009 for the course BIO 183L taught by Professor Dr.beckmann during the Spring '08 term at N.C. State.

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Properties of Enzymes lab report - Maria Tsiolkas...

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