On Argument and Persuasion

On Argument and Persuasion - On Argument &...

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Unformatted text preview: On Argument & Persuasion Introduction Etymology: Argue Etymology: Persuade Etymology Mind vs. Heart vs. Gut: Mind Mind vs. Heart vs. Gut: Heart Mind vs. Heart vs. Gut: Gut Mind & Heart, Argument & Persuasion Proving Purpose Conclusion Assignment To argue or to persuade, that is the question Whether it be nobler of the mind or heart to do one or the other is dependent on the approach toward believability you choose to take when you communicate in this essay form. Each approach has its own focus, too, although your contemporary use of argue or persuade might differ from their root meanings. Lets start at the beginning one more time On Argument & Persuasion Introduction Etymology: Argue Etymology: Persuade Etymology Mind vs. Heart vs. Gut: Mind Mind vs. Heart vs. Gut: Heart Mind vs. Heart vs. Gut: Gut Mind & Heart, Argument & Persuasion Proving Purpose Conclusion Assignment Argue has roots that go deeper than Middle English and stretch beyond Anglo-French. Argue has a Latin source arguere that is reminiscent of Hittite arkuwai and mean to prove (Latin) and plead (Hittite). An argument is products of the act of arguing, which now comes to mean the product of the act of proving or pleading. On Argument & Persuasion Introduction Etymology: Argue Etymology: Persuade Etymology Mind vs. Heart vs. Gut: Mind Mind vs. Heart vs. Gut: Heart Mind vs. Heart vs. Gut: Gut Mind & Heart, Argument & Persuasion Proving Purpose Conclusion Assignment Many times we see people get into arguments, and odds are if weve had any degree of miscommunication with anyone weve been involved in some arguments as well. The arguments I refer to here take the shape of screaming matches, heated verbal exchanges, and while these interactions carry with them an implied value of negativity because of the stress involved in getting through one of those situations they are nonetheless expressions of sides of a particular understanding on an issue (or set of issues) in order to clarify the point of one particular understanding of the subject being covered. On Argument & Persuasion Introduction Etymology: Argue Etymology: Persuade Etymology Mind vs. Heart vs. Gut: Mind Mind vs. Heart vs. Gut: Heart Mind vs. Heart vs. Gut: Gut Mind & Heart, Argument & Persuasion Proving Purpose Conclusion Assignment To say that arguments have a necessarily negative value is not correct, however. Every time we set about to prove something we are arguing a point and your essays thus far are examples of arguments that are not designed to roil the reader or stir the unsteady pot of controversy but instead construct something believable as truth. On Argument & Persuasion Introduction Etymology: Argue Etymology: Persuade Etymology Mind vs. Heart vs. Gut: Mind Mind vs. Heart vs. Gut: Heart Mind vs. Heart vs. Gut: Gut Mind & Heart, Argument & Persuasion Proving Purpose Conclusion Assignment Persuade has no Middle English roots but instead stems directly from Latin. The prefix per- indicates thoroughness directly from Latin....
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This note was uploaded on 04/13/2009 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Winter during the Fall '07 term at Columbia State Community College.

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On Argument and Persuasion - On Argument &...

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