On Comparing and Contrasting

On Comparing and Contrasting - Why do you suppose it is...

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Unformatted text preview: Why do you suppose it is that we have two different words for the same process? That would be a fair question for contemplating the two processes above, except for one thing: theyre not the same processes. Comparing and contrasting are two processes that our contemporary American culture has mistakenly equated and now use interchangeably (although we use comparison most frequently). Identifying them as the same process is an all too easy thing to do, and thats because both processes rely on the ability to examine those things being compared and contrasted as both individual parts as well as their sums. What separates the two is the approach of the examination, and that manifests itself in the language used to describe those things that are being compared and contrasted. Before we work through the rhetoric of the two, we will go back to the basics and examine each process critically so we have a better idea of what it is were really doing when we compare and contrast and can acknowledge the weight of the products of those processes. Tighten up your critical thinking caps, folks. Off we go! On Comparing and Contrasting Introduction Etymology, Meaning and Usage of Compare Etymology, Meaning and Usage of Contrast Associating and Distinguishing the Two Processes Reaching the Core Core: an exercise Scope, Depth, and Core Scope: an exercise Retracting the Scope Othering Subjectivity and Objectivity Language Conclusion Writing Assignment On Comparing and Contrasting Introduction Etymology, Meaning and Usage of Compare Etymology, Meaning and Usage of Contrast Associating and Distinguishing the Two Processes Reaching the Core Core: an exercise Scope, Depth, and Core Scope: an exercise Retracting the Scope Othering Subjectivity and Objectivity Language Conclusion Writing Assignment Compare has its Middle English from Anglo-Norman French from Latin prefix, com- indicating a state of being with something, together with something thoroughly. The -pare stems from the Latin par which references the equal of something. When we compare, then, were looking at the thorough equality, the sameness at the core/essence, shared by those things being compared. Introduction Etymology, Meaning and Usage of Compare Etymology, Meaning and Usage of Contrast Associating and Distinguishing the Two Processes Reaching the Core Core: an exercise Scope, Depth, and Core Scope: an exercise Retracting the Scope Othering Subjectivity and Objectivity Language Conclusion Writing Assignment On Comparing and Contrasting Have you ever heard of something being beyond compare? Take a close look at what that really means, or is intended to mean: for something to be beyond compare, that something is beyond having a thorough equal, it shares nothing at its core that is like anything else. When something is so different at its core that it has no equal there, the focus on the core of that something makes irrelevant anything else about that something. What that core is exactly is like beauty: it lies in the eye of the beholder. Introduction...
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This note was uploaded on 04/13/2009 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Winter during the Fall '07 term at Columbia State Community College.

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On Comparing and Contrasting - Why do you suppose it is...

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