lecture21 - Lecture 21 Dilemmas; Ordinary Language...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 21 Dilemmas; Ordinary Language Arguments Patrick Maher Philosophy 102 Spring 2009 Constructive dilemma ( p q ) ( r s ) p r q s This is a disjunctive modus ponens; it is a valid form. Example If we choose nuclear power, then we increase the risk of a nuclear accident; but if we choose conventional power, then we add to the greenhouse effect. We must choose either nuclear power or conventional power. Therefore, we either increase the risk of nuclear accident or add to the greenhouse effect. ( N I ) ( C A ) N C I A Destructive dilemma ( p q ) ( r s ) q s p r This is a disjunctive modus tollens; it is a valid form. Example If we are to reverse the greenhouse effect, then we must choose nuclear power; but if we are to lower the risk of a nuclear accident, then we must choose conventional power. We will either not choose nuclear power or not choose conventional power....
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lecture21 - Lecture 21 Dilemmas; Ordinary Language...

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