Week 8 Part One -Burma, China and India

Week 8 Part One -Burma, China and India - Week 8:...

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Week 8: China-ASEAN-India:  The Case of Myanmar Outline: Burma’s brief political history China-Burma relations India-Burma relations ASEAN-Burma relations Main question:  To what extent can ASEAN  influence Myanmar and retain ASEAN  unity?
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Discussion questions According to Robert Sutter, what kinds of  influence has China gained in Southeast  Asia relative to the United States over the  past decade?  To what extent has China’s  rise marginalized U.S. interests in the  region? 
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Discussion questions (con’t) Contrary to realist logic, Evelyn Goh  argued that ASEAN has been far more  sophisticated and successful in managing  and harnessing great powers to preserve  East Asian regional order by pursing two  strategies:  “omni-enmeshment”  and  “a  complex balance of influence.”  What does  she mean by these two concepts? What  type of regional order structure does Goh  see emerging in East Asia?
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Burma’s political history Since independence, Burma has been ruled  by a parliamentary democracy 1948–58 and  1960–62);  by constitutional military rule (1974–88); and  By direct military rule (1958–60, 1962–74, 1988 to  the present).  Following Ne Win’s military coup in 1962, he  introduced an autarkic economic program under  the banner of the  Burmese Way to Socialism All important sectors of the economy were  nationalized, and foreign relations with most  countries were severely limited.
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The 1988 Pro-Democracy  Movement In the mid 1980s, economic failure reached  its unbearable point for the majority of  Burmese people.  The   Burmese Socialist Program Party  faced  growing domestic dissidents including  students, monks and workers and they  demanded for political change. In 1988, the pro democracy demonstrations  had brought Rangoon to a standstill, and the  government’s administrative offices were  unable to function.
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The Rise of Military Dictatorship Ne Win used the  tatmadaw  (Burmese  military) to brutally crush demonstrators. Following the West’s reaction to the events of  1988 and 1990 in Rangoon, Burma was  faced with few alternatives but to move closer  to its most important neighbor—China. In June 1989, China itself used its military  force to quell pro-democracy in Tiananmen  Square, naturally bringing Burma and China  closer in terms of political ideology.
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Myanmar under the SLORC “To let the steam out,” Ne Win then offered to  hold a general election in 1990, and the  National League for Democracy won 80  percent of the vote. The State Law and Order Restoration 
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This note was uploaded on 04/14/2009 for the course IR 361 taught by Professor James during the Spring '06 term at USC.

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Week 8 Part One -Burma, China and India - Week 8:...

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