Essay #5 Emily Dickinson

Essay #5 Emily Dickinson - Justin Joseph Prof. Lawrence...

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Justin Joseph 4/5/2005 Prof. Lawrence Essay #5 A famous philosopher, Seneca, was once quoted as saying, “Death: There’s nothing bad about it at all except the thing that comes before it—the fear of it.” Both Whitman and Dickinson understand that death is a natural process of life. However, when it comes to fear of dying, both Whitman and Dickinson are as different as night and day. Unlike Dickinson, Whitman looks forward to dying and is not at all fearful. “I hasten to inform him or her it is just as lucky to die, and I know it” (983). On the other hand, Dickinson is not as embracing of dying as Whitman is. Whitman would most probably agree with Seneca’s philosophy on death because unlike Dickinson, he embraces death. “I pass death with the dying and birth with the new- washed babe, and am not contained between my hat and contained between my hat and boots” (983). Whitman understands that death is sort of a renewal. He understands that his soul is not just contained in his body and that death can be a liberating experience. He
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Essay #5 Emily Dickinson - Justin Joseph Prof. Lawrence...

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