Bio 201 F08 True lect 9v3r

Bio 201 F08 True lect 9v3r - 1st midterm exam Mon Sep. 29,...

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1st midterm exam • Mon Sep. 29, in class – On material through Wed. 9/24 – 35 multiple choice questions – 3 bonus factoids, can only help, cannot hurt Be on time! – Bring your SBU ID and pencils , that’s all • Review sessions – Thursday Sept. 25, 9:30-11:30am – Friday Sept. 26, 1-3pm. – Life Sciences 038 – Bring your questions.
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Corrections • Lecture 5: Slide 25 (on the neutral theory of molecular evolution) – (slide with the picture of Motoo Kimura) • Original version said that Kimura proposed that most mutations are neutral – This is actually not correct – Most mutations are probably deleterious – Slide should say “ Motoo Kimura, in 1968 proposed that most molecular variation in natural populations may be neutral” Version on blackboard has been corrected • Lecture 7: a monophyletic group is also called a clade
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Relationships of major Prokaryote groups
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Major Prokaryote groups Spirochaetes Gram negative chemoheterotrophs move using axial filaments (see prev. lect) includes parasites: syphilis pathogen, Lyme disease pathogen ( Borrelia) Treponema pallidum , the syphilis pathogen
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Major Prokaryote groups Chlamydias smallest bacteria (0.2-1.5 µ m dia.) Gram negative cocci with complex life cycle Obligate parasites (apparently cannot produce much ATP by themselves) Various infection types in humans, incl. STD
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Major Prokaryote groups High GC Gram Positive bacteria Also called actinobacteria (high GC content in DNA) Many have filamentous growth Tuberculosis ( Mycobacterium tuberculosis ) Streptomyces species produce many antibiotics
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Major Prokaryote groups Cyanobacteria “blue green bacteria” Photoautotrophs (use chlorophyll a) Some can perform nitrogen fixation In ancient Earth, transformed the atmosphere by producing Oxygen Many different growth forms, free living or colonial Some cyanobacteria have cellular differentiation
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Major Prokaryote groups Low-GC Gram positive bacteria (not all are Gram positive) Some produce highly environmentally resistant endospores, to survive harsh environments Can survive for 1000s of years, perhaps longer
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This note was uploaded on 04/14/2009 for the course BIO 201 taught by Professor True during the Fall '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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Bio 201 F08 True lect 9v3r - 1st midterm exam Mon Sep. 29,...

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