labintro_LBS172_S-09

labintro_LBS172_S-09 - LB 172L: Principles of General...

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LB 172L: Principles of General Chemistry II - Reactivity Laboratory Manual Spring 2009
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Written by: Dr. Steven Spees Dr. Holly Bevsek Edited by Dr. Ryan Sweeder Dr. Maxine Davis
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2 I. INTRODUCTION Seeing is believing–this simple cliché is the reason why all good introductory chemistry courses have a laboratory component. There is nothing–no lecture, no photo, no simulation, no homework problem–that conveys the idea of “acid reacts with carbonates” as effectively as actually watching hydrochloric acid react with sodium carbonate. Here in Lyman Briggs we consider the laboratory to be an essential part of your education in chemistry, equal in status and well-connected to the lecture. Our hope is that you will find the laboratory interesting as well as useful for increasing your understanding of chemistry. Helping you understand chemical principles is a very important purpose of the lab, however an equally important function of this course is to give you experience with a variety of techniques. These include: safe lab practices, keeping a laboratory notebook, proper handling of chemicals, performing dilutions, and using spectroscopy (the interaction of light with matter) analytically. It is expected that you are familiar and comfortable with all the concepts presented in LB 171L. Subsequent laboratory courses will assume you are proficient with all you encountered both last semester and this semester so it is important for you to learn these now. A final purpose of LB 172L is to help develop your communication skills, which ranges all the way from how you work with a partner (partners should share work equitably; neither partner should have the burden of all the lab or writing work), to writing clear, concise descriptions of your work. This last point is very important when one considers that the ability to write well greatly improves one’s chances of getting a scholarship, getting into a professional school, and getting a job. Overall, through LB 172L you will: 1. Demonstrate proficiency with some more advanced laboratory techniques such as preparing dilutions, running titrations, using spectrophotometry to analyze a solution’s concentration and changes in concentration over time. 2. Develop safe, proper laboratory working habits such as organization, cleanliness, and use of a laboratory notebook. 3. Record and present observations and other data in a scientifically acceptable fashion. 4. Present data analysis and discuss your results in a scientifically acceptable fashion. 5. Develop the ability to form hypotheses regarding chemical phenomena. 6. Design simple experiments to test these hypotheses. 7. Utilize chemical principles to analyze and evaluate these hypotheses. Of course we, as instructors, have goals as well.
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This note was uploaded on 04/15/2009 for the course LB 171L taught by Professor All during the Spring '08 term at Michigan State University.

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labintro_LBS172_S-09 - LB 172L: Principles of General...

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