{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Biology_and_Psychology__Part_1

Biology_and_Psychology__Part_1 - Biology and Psychology...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Biology and Psychology Evolution, Genetics, and Brain Science
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Mind and The Brain: The Story of Phineas Gage
Image of page 2
September 13, 1848 Cavendish, Vermont
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Damage to Gage The tamping iron was 3 feet 7 inches long and weighed 13 1/2 pounds. It was 1 1/4 inches in diameter at one end and tapered over a distance of about 1-foot to a diameter of 1/4 inch at the other. The tamping iron went in point first under his left cheek bone and completely out through the top of his head, landing about 25 to 30 yards behind him.
Image of page 4
Treatment Dr. John Martyn Harlow, the young physician of Cavendish, treated Gage with such success that Gage returned home to Lebanon, New Hampshire 10 weeks later. Months later he returned to work.
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Aftermath: “No Longer Gage” However, Gage’s limbic system was now decoupled from his frontal cortex. This caused profound personality disturbances in Gage. As a consequence, the contractors who had employed him would not give him his place again. Before the accident he had
Image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}